How Should We Measure Multidimensional Inequality? A Philosopher’s Approach (with COVID applications)

Tuesday, July 14, 2020
12:30 pm – 2:00 pm EDT
WebEx

We are pleased to invite you to a new webinar series, “Facing Inequality”, hosted by the Institute for International Economic Policy. This virtual series will focus on current and emerging inequality issues in the U.S. and around the globe. The series will bring attention to aspects of inequality being made increasingly relevant by the current COVID-19 pandemic and associated crises. The series is organized under the stewardship of IIEP Director James Foster, Oliver T. Carr, Jr. Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Economics, and IIEP Faculty Affiliate Trevor Jackson, Assistant Professor of History. The series is co-sponsored by the GW Interdisciplinary Inequality Series, co-organized by Prof. Jackson from the Department of History and Prof. Bryan Stuart from the Department of Economics.

The fifth event, “How Should We Measure Multidimensional Inequality? A Philosopher’s Approach (with COVID applications)” will feature Dr. Kristi Olson of Bowdoin College. The discussion will focus on the following: When we measure multidimensional inequality, we must decide how much weight to give each dimension. The simple approach—giving each dimension equal weight—is almost certainly wrong, but what are the alternatives? This paper critiques some of the familiar approaches: subjective utility and the envy test. It then introduces a new approach. We take as the equal baseline those bundles that could be cooperatively distributed if everyone were free to choose from among all bundles. Using these bundles as the baseline, we can measure the extent of deviation from equality. The approach can be used to evaluate inequalities in, for example, the distribution of COVID risk and income.

 

About the Speakers:

Kristi Olson

Kristi A. Olson is an assistant professor of philosophy at Bowdoin College where she works on issues of distributive justice. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University under the supervision of Thomas Scanlon, Frances Kamm, and Amartya Sen. Her research has been published in such journals as Philosophy & Public Affairs, the Canadian Journal of Philosophy, and Politics, Philosophy & Economics. Prior to pursuing her Ph.D., she worked as a public interest lawyer.

 

Discussants 
Luis Felipe López-Calva, Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, United Nations Development Programme
Jeffrey Brand, Associate Professor of Philosophy, the George Washington University

Imperfect Competition on the Cathedral Floor: Labourers in London 1672 to 1748

Tuesday, June 30, 2020
12:30 pm – 2:00 pm EDT
WebEx

We are pleased to invite you to a new webinar series, “Facing Inequality”, hosted by the Institute for International Economic Policy. This virtual series will focus on current and emerging inequality issues in the U.S. and around the globe. The series will bring attention to aspects of inequality being made increasingly relevant by the current COVID-19 pandemic and associated crises. The series is organized under the stewardship of IIEP Director James Foster, Oliver T. Carr, Jr. Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Economics, and IIEP Faculty Affiliate Trevor Jackson, Assistant Professor of History. The series is co-sponsored by the GW Interdisciplinary Inequality Series, co-organized by Prof. Jackson from the Department of History and Prof. Bryan Stuart from the Department of Economics.

The fourth event, “Imperfect Competition on the Cathedral Floor: Labourers in London 1672-1748” will feature Judy Stephenson and Patrick Wallis. In their paper, they present a new data set for the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century to explore the operation of the market for unskilled construction workers, the reference occupation for long run urban wage series, at one major building site in London. They find patterns of work distribution and pay which indicate characteristics of imperfect competition, most notably high worker and job flows alongside remarkable nominal wage rigidity, and evidence of an internal labour market alongside a much shorter and more fragile working year than has been previously found. The results suggest that wages, or labour’s share of income, may resist response to changes in productivity and labour supply and demand even in the long run, and highlight that labour markets created inequalities of experience, income and returns to work before modern institutions and firms. Professor Bryan Stuart will be a discussant.

About the Speakers:

Judy Stephenson

Judy Stephenson is a Professor of Construction Economics and Finance, and Economic History; a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy; and a Departmental Tutor and Director of Teaching & Learning at Bartlett CPM. She is an economic historian of early modern London, its construction industry and associated markets. She researches construction, labour markets, institutions, firms, finance and industries in London between about 1600 and 1850 and is known for her work on London and English wages between 1650 and 1800. She has published on contracts and wages, and the boundaries of the firm before 1800.

Patrick Wallis

Patrick Wallis is a Professor of Economic History at the London School of Economics. His research explores the economic, social and medical history of Britain and Europe from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. His two main interests are in apprenticeship and human capital and the transformation of healthcare in early modern England. He has recently published two publications, including Access to the Trade: Monopoly and Mobility in European Craft Guilds in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries in the Journal of Social History and Apprenticeship in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge University Press; November 2019).

About the Discussants:

Bryan Stuart is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Michigan in 2017 and joined George Washington University in August 2017. His research interests include labor, public, and urban economics. Recent and current projects examine the effects of recessions on individuals and local areas, the effects of government policies on labor market outcomes, and the determinants and consequences of household location decisions.

Barry Chiswick is a Professor of Economics and International Affairs. He received his Ph.D. in Economics with Distinction from Columbia University and joined George Washington University in 2011. He has held permanent and visiting appointments at UCLA, Columbia University, Stanford University, Princeton University, University of Chicago, City University (New York), Hebrew University (Jerusalem), Tel Aviv University, the University of Haifa, and Ben-Gurion University. From 1973 to 1977, he was Senior Staff Economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. In addition, he served as chairman of the American Statistical Association Census Advisory Committee and past president of the European Society for Population Economics. He is currently Associate Editor of the Journal of Population Economics and Research in Economics of the Household and is on the editorial boards of four other academic journals. Since 2004, he has been the Program Director for Migration Studies at the Institute for the Study of Labor in Bonn, Germany. 

Reckoning with Systemic Hazards

Thursday, June 25, 2020
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm EDT
Zoom

From the pandemic to global social protests to economic and financial crises to the ever-more-evident impacts of climate upheaval, we are seeing in real time the consequences of decades of misguided mindsets about how systems operate. Managing systemic hazards will require a new mind-set and new principles for policy design and action.

In this webinar, IIEP Distinguished Visiting Scholar Sunil Sharma and his co-author ASU-Thunderbird School of Global Management professor Ann Florini will discuss why and how to develop policy and business solutions to these systemic fragilities, based on principles that foster resilience.

Just Governance: Lessons on Climate Change Justice from People in Poverty

Tuesday, June 16, 2020
12:30 pm – 2:00 pm EDT
WebEx

We are pleased to invite you to the third webinar of the “Facing Inequality” series, hosted by the Institute for International Economic Policy. This virtual series focuses on current and emerging inequality issues in the U.S. and around the globe – especially those revealed by the current COVID-19 pandemic. It brings together historians, economists, sociologists, political scientists, and epidemiologists, within the academy and without, to present work and discuss ideas that can facilitate new interdisciplinary approaches to the problem of inequality. This is a platform for dialogue and debate. We invite you to engage with us in this series of important discussions.

The “Facing Inequality” series is organized under the stewardship of IIEP Director James Foster, Oliver T. Carr, Jr. Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Economics, and IIEP Faculty Affiliate Trevor Jackson, Assistant Professor of History. The series is co-sponsored by the GW Interdisciplinary Inequality Series, co-organized by Prof. Jackson from the Department of History and Prof. Bryan Stuart from the Department of Economics. 

 
The third event, “Just Governance: Lessons on Climate Change Justice from People in Poverty”, focuses on issues of climate change and inequality. Specifically, the discussion will prompt attendees to ask, as our world faces catastrophic climate change and related global injustice and oppression, what can those living in the poorest communities most vulnerable to its effects teach us about its causes? Drawing on interdisciplinary and collaborative research in southwestern Bangladesh, this talk shifts the paradigm of responsibility for climate change from the familiar terrain set out by law, economics, and moral philosophy focused on ‘commons’ problems and distributive inequalities to one centered on the lived experience of climate change. Those living with environmental degradation that is exacerbating with climate change and that foreshadows the effects of climate change elsewhere offer clarifying insight into the kinds of normative problems that climate change raises for both justice and governance. Relying on community fabric worn thin by the legacies of colonialism, foreign aid experiments, and exploitable social hierarchies, these communities’ experiences and reflections have implications for how political theorists and policy-influencers, especially large global philanthropists and investors, do and should attend to justice and governance in their work for climate change mitigation, adaptation, and survival.

The climate change crisis reveals the full gamut of humanity’s failure to govern itself in ways that do not exploit nature and humans. This talk identifies what those in poverty most urgently facing the consequences of this failure can teach those must urgently trying to address it. Richly informed by ethnographies, surveys, interviews, and project assessments in 26 communities of those most effected by climate change, the talk will point toward new normative approaches to climate justice and provide a refreshed ethical map to political efficacy.

About the Speaker:

Brooke Ackerly is a Professor of Political Science, Philosophy, and Law, and Affiliated Faculty in Women’s and Gender Studies at Vanderbilt University and co-Editor-in-Chief of the International Feminist Journal of Politics (2018-2021)In her research, teaching, and collaborations, she works to clarify without simplifying the most pressing problems of global justice, including human rights and climate change. Using feminist methodologies, she integrates into her theoretical work empirical research on activism and the experiences of those affected by injustice (Grounded Normative Theory). See Political Theory and Feminist Social Criticism (Cambridge 2000), Universal Human Rights in a World of Difference (Cambridge 2008), Doing Feminist Research with Jacqui True (Palgrave Macmillan 2010, second edition forthcoming), and most recently, Just Responsibility: A Human Rights Theory of Global Justice (Oxford University Press 2018), which won the APSA Victoria Schuck Award for the best book on women and politics.

She is currently working on the intersection of global economic, environmental, and gender justice in their material and epistemic dimensions. She teaches courses on justice, ethics and public policy, feminist theory, feminist research methods, human rights, contemporary political thought, and gender and the history of political thought. She is the winner of the Vanderbilt College of Arts and Science Graduate Teaching Award and the Margaret Cuninggim Mentoring Prize. She is the founder of the Global Feminisms Collaborative, a group of scholars and activists developing ways to collaborate on applied research for social justice. She advises academics and donors on evaluation, methodology, and the ethics of research. She serves the profession through committees in her professional associations including the American Political Science Association (APSA), International Studies Association (ISA), and the European Consortium on Politics and Gender (ECPG). She currently serves on the APSA Committee for the Status of Women in the Profession. She has been a member of the editorial board for Politics and Gender (Journal of the APSA, Women and Politics Section) and is currently a member of the editorial boards of the Political Research QuarterlyJournal of Politics, and Politics, Gender and Identities.

IMF April 2020 World Economic Outlook

Thursday, June 11, 2020
1:00 pm – 2:30 pm EDT
via Webex

Please join the Institute for International Economic Policy for a virtual discussion of the International Monetary Fund’s April 2020 World Economic Outlook.

Agenda

1:00 – 1:05 p.m.: Welcoming Remarks

James Foster, George Washington University 

1:05 – 1:35  p.m.: Chapter 1: Global Prospects and Policies 

Presenter: Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, International Monetary Fund

Discussant: Jason Furman, Harvard Kennedy School

1:40 – 2:05 p.m.: Chapter 2: Countering Future Recessions in Advanced Economies: Cyclical Polices in an Era of Low Rates and High Debt 

Presenter:  Wenjie Chen, International Monetary Fund

Discussant: Jay Shambaugh, George Washington University & Hamilton Project                

2:05 – 2:30 p.m.: Chapter 3: Dampening Global Financial Shocks in Emerging Markets: Can Macroprudential Regulation Help?             

Presenters: Katharina Bergant, International Monetary Fund

Niels-Jakob Hansen, International Monetary Fund

Discussant: Sunil Sharma, George Washington University

2:30 p.m.: Concluding Remarks            

Read the full World Economic Outlook here

The COVID-19 pandemic is inflicting high and rising human costs worldwide, and the necessary protection measures are severely impacting economic activity. As a result of the pandemic, the global economy is projected to contract sharply by –3 percent in 2020, much worse than during the 2008–09 financial crisis. In a baseline scenario–which assumes that the pandemic fades in the second half of 2020 and containment efforts can be gradually unwound—the global economy is projected to grow by 5.8 percent in 2021 as economic activity normalizes, helped by policy support. The risks for even more severe outcomes, however, are substantial. Effective policies are essential to forestall the possibility of worse outcomes, and the necessary measures to reduce contagion and protect lives are an important investment in long-term human and economic health. Because the economic fallout is acute in specific sectors, policymakers will need to implement substantial targeted fiscal, monetary, and financial market measures to support affected households and businesses domestically. And internationally, strong multilateral cooperation is essential to overcome the effects of the pandemic, including to help financially constrained countries facing twin health and funding shocks, and for channeling aid to countries with weak health care systems.
 
More than a decade after the global financial crisis, the world is struggling with the health and economic effects of a profound new crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Advanced economies entered this crisis with interest rates at historical lows and public debts, on average, higher than they had been over the past 60 years. They will come out from the crisis with even higher public debts. Drawing on analysis completed before the emergence of the pandemic, this chapter examines policymakers’ options to respond to adverse shocks and build resilience when rates are low and debts high.
 
As discussed in Chapter 1, the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting emerging markets through an unprecedented mix of domestic and external shocks whose combined effects are very hard to predict. Among these, emerging markets are confronting a sharp tightening in global financial conditions. Against this backdrop, this chapter asks whether, based on historical experience, countries that have adopted a more stringent level of macroprudential regulation—aimed at strengthening financial stability—are better placed to withstand the impact of global financial shocks on domestic macroeconomic conditions.

Can Internationally Accepted Principles Yield Trustworthy AI?

Thursday June 4, 2020

11:00AM – 12:00PM EDT

When you use spell-check, shop on Amazon, or find a movie on Netflix, you are using AI. While AI may improve our quality and standard of living, use of poorly designed AI may undermine human autonomy, reduce employment, and yield discriminatory outcomes.  To forestall such potential  negative spillovers, in 2019, the 37 members of the OECD (and 7 non-members) approved Principles on Artificial Intelligence, the first internationally accepted principles for AI. The principles include recommendations for policymakers and all stakeholders.  

The OECD is not the only body working on such principles. The members of the G-7 are also working on mutually agreed principles to govern trustworthy explainable AI. 

For this webinar, on Thursday June 4 at 11:00AM – Noon EDT, we will explore these principles, focusing in particular on those at the OECD, which our speakers helped design. We will discuss whether these principles can help all stakeholders. Moreover, we will examine whether such principles should evolve into an internationally shared rules-based system, given the wide diversity in national capacity to produce and govern AI. We will begin with a moderated discussion and then move on to your questions. Please join us.   Please note some of our speakers have changed. 

Speakers:

– Ryan Budish, Assistant Research Director, Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, Harvard University

– Adam Murray, U.S. diplomat in the Office of International Communications and Information Policy at the Department of State.

– Nicolas Miailhe, Founder and President, The Future Society

Women and the Web Webinar

When: Thursday May 28, 11AM EDT
Where: Zoom.us

While we can’t generalize, gender identity colors how many individuals experience the web. We write to invite you to our next webinar, where we will focus on women’s online experience. Our discussion will build on research done by the World Wide Web Foundation and US Agency for International Development, among others. The webinar, Women and the Web, will take place on Thursday May 28 at 11 AM EDT. We will discuss issues of access and participation, discrimination, bullying, other online issues, and potential remedies. We will begin with a moderated discussion and then move on to your questions. Please join us.

Speakers:
– Chenai Chair, Research Manager – Gender and Digital Rights, Web Foundation, Johannesburg, South Africa
– Revi Stirling, Director, US AID, WomenConnect Challenge

We are grateful to Dhanaraj Thakur, Research Director at Center for Democracy and Technology, who suggested this webinar. Until then, the DataGovHub team — Thomas Struett, James Nelson, and Susan Aaronson, wish you the best.
datagovhub.elliott.gwu.edu

This event is co-sponsored by Digital Trade & Data Governance Hub; Internet Society: Greater Washington DC Chapter; George Washington Center for International Business Education and Research (GW-CIBER); Centre for International Governance Innovation; World Wide Web Foundation; Center for New American Security; and Institute for International Science and Technology Policy.

Will Covid-19 Raise Inequality? Evidence from Past Epidemics and Crises

Tuesday, May 26, 2020
12:30 pm – 2:00 pm EDT
WebEx

We are pleased to invite you to the second webinar of the “Facing Inequality” series, hosted by the Institute for International Economic Policy. This virtual series focuses on current and emerging inequality issues in the U.S. and around the globe – especially those revealed by the current COVID-19 pandemic. It brings together historians, economists, sociologists, political scientists, and epidemiologists, within the academy and without, to present work and discuss ideas that can facilitate new interdisciplinary approaches to the problem of inequality. This is a platform for dialogue and debate. We invite you to engage with us in this series of important discussions.
 
The second event, “Will Covid-19 Raise Inequality? Evidence from Past Epidemics and Crises”, features Prakash Loungani and Jonathan D. Ostry. Major epidemics in this century, such as SARS and H1N1, have raised income inequality and disproportionately hurt employment prospects of people with low skills and education levels. What impacts will the COVID-19 pandemic have on inequality in the near term? And how will inequality evolve over the longer-term as governments act to mend the disruptions to globalization and unwind the build-up in their public debts? The talk will draw on the authors’ recent work (with Davide Furceri) on the distributional impacts of epidemics and their book on other drivers of inequality such as austerity and financial globalization. Discussants Lucia Rafanelli and Remi Jedwab will provide commentary from the perspectives of political science and economic history, respectively.
 
The “Facing Inequality” series is organized under the stewardship of IIEP Director James Foster, Oliver T. Carr, Jr. Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Economics, and IIEP Faculty Affiliate Trevor Jackson, Assistant Professor of History. The series is co-sponsored by the GW Interdisciplinary Inequality Series, co-organized by Prof. Jackson from the Department of History and Prof. Bryan Stuart from the Department of Economics.

About the Speakers:

Prakash Loungani is Assistant Director and Senior Personnel Manager in the IMF’s Independent Evaluation Office. He is a co-author of Confronting Inequality: How Societies Can Choose Inclusive Growth (Columbia University Press, 2019). Previously, he headed the Development Macroeconomics Division in the IMF’s Research Department and was co-chair of the IMF’s Jobs and Growth working group from 2011-15. He is an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University’s Carey School of Business, a member of the Research Program in Forecasting at George Washington Univeristy, and Senior Fellow at the Policy Center for the New South, a think-tank based in Rabat, Morocco.

Jonathan D. Ostry is Deputy Director of the Asia and Pacific Department at the International Monetary Fund and a Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR). His recent responsibilities include leading staff teams on capital account management and financial globalization issues; fiscal sustainability issues; and the nexus between income inequality and economic growth. Past positions include leading the division that produces the IMF’s flagship multilateral surveillance publication, the World Economic Outlook. He is the author of a number of books on international macro policy issues and numerous articles in scholarly journals. His most recent books include Taming the Tide of Capital Flows (MIT Press, 2017) and Confronting Inequality (Columbia University Press, 2018).

With James Foster, Lucia Rafanelli, Remi Jedwab, and Trevor Jackson

Co-sponsored by the GW Inequality Series

Elliott Experts Weigh in: The Global Economic System in the Age of Coronavirus

Thursday, May 7, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
via Zoom (EDT)

In this edition of the Elliott School’s Experts Weigh In Series, Professor Maggie Chen will discuss the global economic system in the age of coronavirus. Following the best year for stocks since 2019, coronavirus managed to fell the global market faster than during the Great Depression. More Americans have filed for unemployment than ever before and dozens of countries have already sought the assistance of the IMF. Professor Chen will provide an overview of the current state of play and the factors influencing the global economic situation, as well as offer thoughts on what recovery might look like.

 

Maggie Chen New HeadshotMaggie Xiaoyang Chen is Professor of Economics and International Affairs at George Washington University. She has worked as an economist in the research department of the World Bank and a consultant for the World Bank, the International Finance Cooperation, the Inter-American Development Bank, and the U.S. Congressional  Budget Office. She has served as Director of the Institute for International Economic Policy at George Washington University and is a co-editor of the Economic Inquiry and an associate editor of the Economic Modelling. Professor Chen’s research areas include multinational firms, international trade, and regional trade agreements. Her work has been published in academic journals such as the Review of Economics  and Statistics, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Journal of International Economics, and Journal of Development Economics. Professor Chen received her Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Colorado at Boulder and her B.A. in Economics from Beijing Normal University.

Data & Human Rights During the Pandemic

Thursday April 30

11AM EDT

Zoom

While many analysts have focused on threats to online privacy, other human rights, including freedom of expression and access to information online, can also be affected. For example, some countries have not fully informed their citizens about public health risks, which can affect not only their citizens’ right to access information, but possibly their right to life. This webinar will examine the responsibilities of both firms and governments during this pandemic, with a particular focus to human rights online.

Digital Trade & Data Governance Hub’s speakers will be:

– Professor David Kaye, University of California, Irvine, Director, International Justice Clinic and UN Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression

– Dr. Courtney Radsch, Advocacy Director at the Committee to Protect Journalists and author of Cyberactivism and Citizen Journalism in Egypt

Our speakers will speak for 10 minutes each and then answer questions from the audience. Please email questions in advance to: datagovhub@gwu.edu

Due to the growing popularity of this webinar series, Digital Trade & Data Governance Hub is streamlining their registration process. Please register for each individual webinar in order to receive a Zoom link to attend. Please read on for details and the registration link for the next webinar. 

This event is co-sponsored by Digital Trade & Data Governance Hub; Internet Society: Greater Washington DC Chapter; Centre for International Governance Innovation; World Wide Web Foundation; and Institute for International Science and Technology Policy.

Webinar on Data Governance in Smart Cities

Thursday, April 9, 2020
11:00 am EST

Zoom

We are pleased to invite you to the second webinar hosted by The Digital Trade and Data Governance Hub. The webinars focus on current and emerging data governance issues. Seminar 2 will be on “Data Governance in Smart Cities” and will take place on April 9 at 11am EST. This event will be co-sponsored by the Internet Society, the World Wide Web Foundation, the Centre for International Governance Innovation, and the Institute for International Economic Policy.

Although we often talk about data governance as a national or international issue, cities are on the front lines of dealing with a wide range of data governance issues from privacy to the regulation of AI. This webinar will give attendees a greater understanding of why they might want to learn more about how cities are trying to balance the costs and benefits of data-driven services.

The speakers will be Professor Teresa Scassa, Canada Research Chair in Information Law, University of Ottawa Law School and Bianca Wylie, Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI). They will address the following questions:

  • What is a smart city?
  • What kinds of rules must cities develop to determine what entities can own, utilize and monetize smart city data?
  • Should cities adopt special rules and considerations for personal data and human behavioral data?
  • Cities have bought into very complex data-driven systems, in the belief that data is “the solution.” Is it adding value and leading to more effective city management? What are the trade offs–e.g. energy efficiency vs. the loss of privacy

This event is co-sponsored by Digital Trade & Data Governance Hub; Internet Society: Greater Washington DC Chapter; Centre for International Governance Innovation; World Wide Web Foundation; and Institute for International Science and Technology Policy.

Webinar on E-Commerce at the WTO: What’s Going On?

Monday, March 30, 2020
11:00 am EST

Zoom

We are pleased to invite you to the first webinar hosted by The Digital Trade and Data Governance Hub in a series of free webinars on current and emerging data governance issues. As we “social distance,” we can simultaneously build a broader understanding of domestic and international data governance issues. The Digital Trade and Data Governance Hub is partnering with business associations such as the Computer and Communications Industry Association, civil society groups such as the Internet Society Washington DC and the World Wide Web Foundation, and other research organizations such as the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) to host these events. The webinars will be conducted on Zoom and attendees will be encouraged to ask questions of the speakers.

The inaugural seminar, to take place at 11am (EST) on March 30, 2020, will be “E-Commerce at the WTO: What’s Going On?” The speaker will be Victor do Prado, Director, Council and Trade Negotiations Committee Division, WTO. This event will be co-organized with the Computer and Communications Industry Association and co-sponsored with the Institute for International Economic Policy. Mr. do Prado’s remarks will cover the history, status and future of the talks, including the e-commerce moratorium. He will speak for 15 minutes and then the floor will be opened to questions using Zoom’s raise-your-hand application. As a WTO official, Mr. do Prado will be speaking off the record. His remarks cannot be attributed but can be used on background. The press is welcome to attend and observe Chatham House rules. 

Please contact James Nelson, Director of Communications and Strategy at the Digital Trade and Data Governance Hub, with any questions or suggestions for webinars jinelson@gwu.edu

This event is co-sponsored by Digital Trade & Data Governance Hub; Internet Society: Greater Washington DC Chapter; Centre for International Governance Innovation; World Wide Web Foundation; and Institute for International Science and Technology Policy.

Why Has Data Become a National Security Issue?

Thursday, April 16, 2020
11:00 am EDT

via Zoom

We are pleased to invite you to the third webinar hosted by The Digital Trade and Data Governance Hub. The webinars focus on current and emerging data governance issues. Seminar 3 will be on “Why has data become a national security issue?” and will take place on April 16 at 11am EDT. This event will be co-sponsored by the Internet Society, the World Wide Web Foundation, the Centre for International Governance Innovation, the Center for a New American Security, the Institute for International Science & Technology Policy, GW Ciber, and the Institute for International Economic Policy. 

The speakers will be Carrie Cordero, Robert M. Gates Senior Fellow and General Counsel at the Center for a New American Security, Colonel Sarah Albrycht, Senior Military Fellow, CNAS and Colonel in the US Army, and Susan Aaronson, Hub Director and Senior Fellow, CIGI. While the conversation will be on the record, Colonel Abrycht’s views are her own, and do not reflect the official position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Our moderator will be Aaron Shull, Managing Director and General Counsel at CIGI.   

For a quick overview of their perspectives, see 

Cordero – The National Security Imperative of Protecting User Data (CNAS, Apr. 24, 2019)

Albrycht – When the homefront becomes the (cyber) front line (Fifth Domain, Feb. 3, 2020)

Aaronson – Inadequate data protection: A threat to economic and national security (VoxEU, Feb. 5, 2020) (this is a summary of the full CIGI paper, available shortly.)

Cordero, Albrycht and Aaronson will speak for 7 minutes each and then answer questions from the audience. Please email questions in advance to: datagovhub@gwu.edu

A Zoom link will be sent out 24 hours prior to the webinar.

Please join us! 

This event is co-sponsored by Digital Trade & Data Governance Hub; Internet Society: Greater Washington DC Chapter; George Washington Center for International Business Education and Research (GW-CIBER); Centre for International Governance Innovation; World Wide Web Foundation; Center for New American Security; and Institute for International Science and Technology Policy.

The LEAP Initiative with Jorge Dajani, Chief Ethics Officer, World Bank

Tuesday, April 14th, 2020

12:00pm – 1:00pm EST

The event will be held virtually via Zoom Webinar with a Moderated Q&A.
 

Jorge Dajani is the Chief Ethics Officer of the World Bank Group. He will describe the organization and activities of the ethics function of the World Bank Group, and explain, more generally, the specificities of ethics functions in international public organizations. He will emphasize the importance of creating a value-based culture. He will conclude with examples of challenging questions that an ethics function needs to address and discuss these with the students.

Jorge Dajani’s Bio: 

Jorge Dajani became the Chief Ethics Officer of the World Bank Group on June 15, 2018.

Dajani brings to this role a deep knowledge of multilateral development banks, a proven track record in corporate strategy and development, and a reputation for effective stakeholder engagement.  He has been widely recognized for his management skills and stewardship of policies and procedures within international financial institutions with a focus on strategy, ethics and governance. 

Prior to this position, Mr. Dajani was Alternate Executive Director at the International Monetary Fund, a position he held since 2016. Previously, he served as Director General for Macroeconomic Analysis and International Finance at the Ministry of Economy of Spain. He has served on the Boards of Governors and Boards of Directors of several multilateral banks, including the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, CAF-Development Bank of Latin America, and the African Development Bank. He was Spain’s chief negotiator for the establishment of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and the Green Climate Fund.  He has also been a member of the economic policy committees of the European Union and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

As Chief Ethics Officer, Mr. Dajani directs the Ethics and Business Conduct Department, which promotes the development and application of the highest ethical standards by staff members in the performance of their duties. He provides overall strategic leadership on ethics and business conduct, ensuring that ethics and the Bank Group’s values are fully incorporated into the strategy of the entire World Bank Group. He reports directly to the President of the World Bank Group.

Mr. Dajani, a Spanish national, has a Bachelor´s and a Master´s degree in Economics from Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. He speaks Spanish, English, French and Mandarin.

This event is co-sponsored by the Elliott School of International Affairs, and is a part of the Leadership, Ethics, and Practice (LEAP) Initiative.

 

“Intervention without Empire: The Ethics of Foreign Influence in a Neo-Colonial World” with Dr. Lucia Rafanelli

Monday, February 3, 2020
5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons 602
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St. NW

In a world filled with state-sanctioned oppression, many look to the international community to help secure justice when states fail or refuse to do so. But attempts by actors in one society to “promote justice” in another evoke the specter of colonialism. Indeed, even after formal decolonization, global politics bears potent markers of its imperial past. Current geopolitical power structures, embodied in both formal institutions and informal behavioral patterns, continue to empower people in the global West and North and disempower people in the global South, and what some refer to as the “Third World.” This raises the question: is there any way international actors can promote (their ideas of) justice around the world without reinforcing and perpetuating the objectionable power hierarchies associated with colonialism?

 

Dr. Rafanelli will argue there are ways for international actors to do so, but to meet this challenge, they must adhere to certain moral principles.

 

SPEAKER BIO

Dr. Lucia Rafanelli’s work has been published in Political Studies (2019) and The Journal of Political Philosophy (2017). Her book project, Promoting Justice Across Borders: Political Theory for the New Global Politics, develops ethical standards for what she calls “reform intervention” – an expansive category encompassing any deliberate attempt to promote justice in another society. Her primary research interests include contemporary political theory, global justice, and theories of human rights. She also has philosophical interests in collective agency and collective personhood, philosophy of law, and the ethics of artificial intelligence. She received her Ph.D. in Politics (with a specialization in Political Theory) from Princeton University in 2018.

She is an Assistant Professor of Political Science & International Affairs at the George Washington University and is a former affiliate of the Princeton Dialogues on AI and Ethics program and a current affiliate of the Institute for International Economic Policy at the George Washington University.

Read more about her here.

Agricultural Transformation and Farmers’ Expectations: Experimental Evidence from Uganda

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

12:30 pm -2.00pm

Monroe Hall, Seminar Room 321 

2115 G St NW, Washington, DC 20052

Why adoption rate of potentially pro table agricultural technologies in Africa remains low is still puzzling. This paper uses a randomized control trial to study Ugandan subsistence smallholders’ decisions to adopt cash crops. A unique way of eliciting farmers price and yield expectations allows us to investigate the role of farmers’ ex-ante beliefs about crop profitability on adoption decisions. We find that the provision of extension services increases oilseeds adoption by 15%, and farmers who underestimate oilseeds price at baseline are the most likely to adopt the new crops. The results suggest that changes in expectations drive agricultural technology take-up.

Paper: “Agricultural Transformation and Farmers’ Expectations: Experimental Evidence from Uganda” by Harounan Kazianga (Oklahoma State University)

Colonial Origins and Fertility: Can the Market Overcome History?

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

12:30 pm -2.00pm

Monroe Hall, Seminar Room 321

2115 G St NW, Washington, DC 20052

Can market incentives overcome the long-term impact of historical institutions? We address this question by focusing on the role of colonial reproductive laws in shaping fertility behavior in Africa. Exploiting the arbitrary division of ancestral ethnic homelands and the resulting discontinuity in institutions across the British-French colonial borders, we find that women in former British areas are more likely to delay sexual debut and marriage, and that they have fewer children. However, these effects disappear in areas with exogenously high market access, where the opportunity cost of childbearing appears to be high irrespective of colonizer identity. They are only present in areas with low market access, where economic opportunities are scarcer. This heterogeneous impact of colonial origins remarkably extends to various measures of local economic development and household welfare. Examining causal mechanisms, we find that the fertility effect of colonial origins is directly linked to colonial reproductive laws and their impact on the use of modern methods of birth control. We rule out the impact of British colonization on income and women’s human capital as the primary channels through which its fertility effect operates. By uncovering novel findings on the heterogeneous nature of the colonial origins of comparative fertility behavior and economic development, our analysis implies that appropriately designed economic incentives can overcome the bonds of historical determinism.
 

Paper: “Colonial Origins and Fertility: Can the Market Overcome History?” by Roland Pongou (University of Ottawa)

Data as a Development Issue Conference

Friday, January 31, 2020
9:00am-5:00pm
Elliott School of International Affairs
Linder Commons Room
1957 E Street, NW
Washington, DC 20052

Agenda

9:00am: Welcome Professor James Foster, Professor and Director, Institute for International Economic Policy and George Washington University

9:15am: Presentation by Vivien Foster, World Bank, Chief Economist for the Infrastructure Vice-Presidency

9:50am: Coffee Break

10:00am: Data and Development: How will data and the data-drive economy affect development?

  • Emmanuel F. LeTouze, Co-founder and Director, Data Pop

  • Vivian Ranson, Lead, Development Informatics Team, US Agency for International Development

  • Stefaan Verhulst, Co-Founder and Chief of Research and Development, Governance, The Governance Lab
  • Chair: Susan Aaronson, Research Professor and Director, Digital Trade and Data Governance Hub, George Washington University 

11:30am: Lunch & Keynote Presentation by Claire Melamed, CEO, Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data

1:15pm: Governing Data for Development: What does good data governance look like? How can

development organizations best promote sound data practices?

  • Shaida Badiee, Managing Director, Open Data Watch

  • Agnieszka Rawa, Managing Director, Data Collaboratives for Local Impact, Millennium Challenge Corporation

  • Priya Vora, CEO, Future State

  • Chair: Michael Pisa, Policy Fellow, Center for Global Development

2:45pm: Coffee Break

3:00pm: A Global Framework for Inclusive Development: How can low- and middle-income countries participate on equal terms in a data-driven economy?

  • Burcu Kilic, Director, Digital Rights Program & Research Director, Public Citizen

  • Nanjala Nyabola, Writer, Humanitarian Advocate and Political
    Analyst

  • Sreekanth Mukku, Project Manager, Data Privacy in the Global South, Konnektiv Kollektiv

  • Teresa Scassa, Canada Research Chair in Information Law and Policy, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law
  • Chair: Sabine Muscat, Program Director, Technology and Digital Policy, Heinrich Böll Stiftung, Washington, DC

4:30pm: Concluding remarks by Shantayanan Devarajan, Commissioner of the Pathways to Prosperity Commission on Technology and Inclusive Development and Professor at Georgetown University

5:00pm: Conference Concludes

Conference Organizers
Susan Aaronson, Ph.D, George Washington University
Sebastian Duwe, Ph.D., Heinrich Boll Foundation, Washington DC
Michael Pisa, Center for Global Development, Washington DC
Sabine Weyand Heinrich Boll Foundation, Washington DC
Thanks to Kyle Renner and his staff for making the trains run on time, outreach, and food..

 

7th Annual Conference Washington Area Development Economics Symposium (WADES)

Friday, April 5, 2019
Center for Global Development
2055 L St NW, 5th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20036

The Washington Area Development Economics Symposium (WADES) is an annual research conference which highlights academic work from researchers at leading economics institutions in development economics in the Washington DC area. Researchers from George Washington University, University of Maryland, Georgetown University, Johns Hopkins University, University of Virginia, the World Bank, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), American University, George Mason University, and the Center for Global Development are all participants in the symposium.

Conference Organizers:
Remi Jedwab, George Washington University
Jessica Goldberg, University of Maryland
Molly Lipscomb, University of Virginia
Andrew Zeitlin, Georgetown University

Agenda

8:30 – 9:00: Registration

9:00 – 9:45: Faculty Presentation:

“The Sustainability of Early Education Interventions: Do Learning Gains and Improved Teacher Practices Persist?” Jacobus Cilliers (Georgetown University)

9:45 – 10:30: Graduate Student Presentation:

“The gains from market integration: Rural roads, and separability of production and consumption decisions in smallholder farms” Hundanol Kebede (University of Virginia), Discussant: Jessica Goldberg (University of Maryland)

10:30 – 10:45: Coffee Break

10:45 – 11:30: Graduate Student Presentation:

“Measuring External Validity” Hao Bo (University of Maryland), Discussant: Owen Ozier (World Bank)
11:30 – 12:15 Faculty presentation: “Repelling Rape: Foreign Direct Investment Empowers Women” Sheetal Sekhri (University of Virginia)

12:15 – 1:00: Lunch

1:00 – 1:45: Graduate Student Presentation:

“The Precocious Period: Menarche, Education and Marriage in India” Madhulika Khanna (Georgetown University), Discussant: Pamela Jakiela (Center for Global Development)

1:45 – 2:30: Graduate Student Presentation:

“The Silenced Women: An Investigation on Reporting of Violence Against Women” Abhilasha Sahay (George Washington University), Discussant: Kelly Jones (American University)

2:30 – 3:15: Faculty Presentation:

“Peer effects on Violence: Experimental Evidence in El Salvador” Lelys Dinarte (World Bank)

3:15 – 3:30: Coffee Break

3:30 – 4:15: Faculty Presentation:

“Including Males: Improving Sexual and Reproductive Health for Female Adolescents” Jennifer Muz (George Washington University)

4:15 – 5:00: Faculty Presentation:

“Persuasion by Populist Propaganda: Individual Level Evidence from the 2015 Argentine Ballotage” Sebastian Galiani (University of Maryland)

Mardi Dungey Memorial Research Conference

Mardi Dungey Memorial Research Conference
Friday, February 21, 2020
8:00 am – 5:30 pm (Conference)
5:30pm – 7:30 pm (Reception)
Lindner Commons, Suite 602
1957 E St NW
Washington, D.C. 20052

On behalf of the Institute for International Economic Policy, the Research Program on Forecasting, the Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, University of Tasmania, and the Society for Nonlinear Dynamics and Econometrics, you are cordially invited to the Mardi Dungey Memorial Research Conference on February 21, 2020. The event is named in honor of Mardi Dungey, Professor of Economics and Finance at the University of Tasmania, Adjunct Professor and Program Director, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, ANU, Senior Research Associate at the Centre for Financial Analysis and Policy at Cambridge University, and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.

Agenda

8:00am- 8:45am: Breakfast

8:45am – 9:10am

Introduction, Stephen Smith, Chair, Department of Economics and Professor of Economics and International Affairs, Institute for International Economic Policy, GWU

Opening Remarks, Tara Sinclair, George Washington University

9:10 – 9:30am: A Panel on Mardi Dungey’s Contributions

Vanessa Smith, University of York

Renee Fry-McKibbin, Australian National University

Warwick McKibbin, Australian National University

Chaired by: Renee Fry-McKibbin, Australian National University

9:30 – 10:30am

Econometrics of Option Pricing with Stochastic Volatility, Eric Renault, University of Warwick

Chaired by: Vance Martin, University of Melbourne

10:30 – 11:00am: Coffee Break

11:00 – 11:45am

Leaning Against the Wind: An Empirical Cost-Benefit Analysis, Gaston Gelos, International Monetary Fund

Chaired by: Tara Sinclair, George Washington University

11:45am – 12:30pm

The Gains from Catch-up for China and the U.S.: An Empirical Framework, Denise Osborn, University of Manchester

Chaired by: Simon van Norden, HEC Montréal, CIREQ & CIRANO

12:30 – 1:30pm: Lunch Break

1:30 – 2:30pm

Measurement of Factor Strength: Theory and Practice, Hashem Pesaran, Cambridge University

Chaired by: Nigel Ray, International Monetary Fund

2:30 – 2:45pm: Coffee Break

2:45 – 3:30pm

Inflation: Expectations, Structural Breaks, and Global Factors, Pierre Siklos, Wilfrid Laurier University

Chaired by: Gerald Dwyer, Clemson University

3:30 – 4:15pm

Multivariate Trend-Cycle-Seasonal Decomposition with Correlated Innovations, Jing Tian, University of Tasmania

Chaired by: Edda Claus, Wilfrid Laurier University

4:15 – 4:30pm: Coffee Break

4:30 – 5:15pm

The Center and the Periphery: Two Hundred Years of International Borrowing Cycles, Graciela Kaminsky, George Washington University

Chaired by: Brenda Gonzalez-Hermosillo, International Monetary Fund

5:15 – 5:30pm: Closing Remarks

Marty Robinson, Australian Treasury

Vladimir Volkov, University of Tasmania

Warwick McKibbin, Australian National University

Chaired by: Renee Fry-McKibbin, Australian National University

5:30 – 7:30pm: Reception

Seminar on Governing Finance for Sustainability

Wednesday, October 16th, 2019

9:30am-11:30am, Light Lunch: 11:30am-12:30pm

City View Room, 7th Floor

Elliott School of International Affairs

1957 E St NW, Washington, DC 20052

Synopsis

The nexus between financial governance, macroeconomic and financial stability, social cohesion, and environmental sustainability has become the subject of a growing debate among policymakers and market participants. Current beliefs on central banking and financial regulation are being questioned in the face of systemic challenges such as rising income inequality, growing market concentration, political polarization, accelerating climate change, and  disruptions from new financial technologies.  

Do the mandates and instruments of financial authorities remain fit for purpose? Do the objectives and operations of central banks and financial regulators, along with their independence and accountability, need revision to deal with the rapidly changing conditions of the 21st century? How do financial authorities ensure alignment with longer term policy goals? To what extent should social and environmental sustainability feature on their agendas?

The panel discussion will examine this important debate, including the following questions: 

  • What objectives should central banks and financial regulators pursue?
  • What reforms, if any, are required to reflect these objectives in mandates, instruments, and institutions?
  • What could be the pathways to reform?

Agenda

9.00 – 9.30 am Arrival of panelists and participants

9.30 – 9.45 am: Welcome and Introductory Remarks

James Foster, Oliver T. Carr, Jr. Professor of International Affairs and Economics, and Director, Institute for International Economic Policy (IIEP), Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University (GWU).

Sunil Sharma, Distinguished Visiting Scholar, IIEP, Elliott School, GWU, former Assistant Director, Research Department, IMF.

9.45 – 11.30 am: Panel Discussion and Q & A

Patrick Honohan, Honorary Professor of Economics, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland; former Governor, Central Bank of Ireland.

Signe Krogstrup, Assistant Governor, Head of Economics and Monetary Policy, Danmarks Nationalbank; former Adviser, Research Department, IMF.

Gillian Tett, Chair, Editorial Board, and Editor-at-Large, US, The Financial Times. 

William White, Senior Fellow, C.D. Howe Institute, Canada; and former Economic Adviser and Head of the Monetary and Economic Department, Bank for International Settlements.

Moderator: Alexander Barkawi, Director, Council on Economic Policies, Switzerland.

11.30 am – 12.30 pm: Light Lunch 

Organizing Committee: Alexander Barkawi (CEP), Kyle Renner (IIEP, GWU), Sunil Sharma (IIEP, GWU), Simon Zadek (UNDP).

Co-sponsored by the Council on Economic Policies

 

A New Push on Women’s Economic Empowerment: A High Level Ministerial Panel

Wednesday, October 16th, 2019
3:00pm- 4:15pm
City View Room, 7th Floor
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW Washington DC 20052

The aim of the high-level ministerial panel is to provide fresh impetus to the push for Women’s Economic Empowerment, bringing together thought leaders and policy practitioners in a frank discussion of what more can be done in the context of effective and inclusive development strategies. The panel will focus on concrete ways to remove constraints to women’s economic activity, enabling them to increase incomes and status, while at the same time contributing to more equitable economic growth.

Speakers include:

Hon. Arturo Herrera, Minister of Finance, Mexico.

Hon. Benigno Lopez, Minister of Finance, Paraguay.

Dr. Nancy Birdsall, Founder of the Center for Global Development and former Executive Vice President of the Inter-American Development Bank.

Moderated by: Prof. Danny Leipziger, Professor of International Business and International Affairs, George Washington University, Managing Director of the Growth Dialogue

This event is co-sponsored by the Growth Dialogue at the George Washington Business School and the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies M.A. Program and the Gender Equality in International Affairs Initiative.

Policy-making in a World of Greater Uncertainty

Wednesday, October 16, 2019
4:45 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

City View Room, 7th Floor
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW
Washington, D.C., 20052

The aim of the high-level panel is to consider the host of new economic challenges facing policymakers, as they face increased global uncertainty. In Emerging Market Economies in particular, trade wars, uncertain monetary stances, disruptive technologies, and increased nationalism have created new sets of policy problems for governments attempting to deal with their domestic concerns in an increasingly fractured global environment.

Speakers include: 

Hon. Ahmed Shide, Minister of Finance, Ethiopia.
Dr. Reza Moghadam, Vice Chairman, Morgan Stanley International.
Dr. Joaquim Levy, former Minister of Finance, Brazil.

Moderator: Dr.Danny Leipziger, Professor of International Business and International Affairs, George Washington University and Managing Director of the Growth Dialogue.

 

This event is co-sponsored by the Growth Dialogue at the George Washington School of Business and the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies M.A. program (LASP).

Ethics and Leadership: A discussion on ‘America First’ Foreign Policy with Patrick Fine

Monday, September 16th from 5:00 PM to 6:00 PM

Elliott School of International Affairs
Conference Room 505
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052


Patrick C. Fine is the Chief Executive Officer of FHI 360, a nonprofit human development organization dedicated to improving lives in lasting ways by advancing integrated, locally driven solutions.

Before joining FHI 360, Fine served as the Vice President for Compact Operations at the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), where he helped to shape nontraditional approaches to U.S. bilateral assistance through his oversight of large-scale investment partnerships with 24 countries. From 2006 to 2010, he was Senior Vice President of the Global Learning Group at the Academy for Educational Development (AED).

As a career member of the Foreign Service at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Fine served as the Senior Deputy Assistant Administrator in the Africa Bureau and Mission Director in Afghanistan, where he led the rapid expansion of U.S. assistance for reconstruction and development…read more

The Power of Public Private Partnerships to Drive Gender Equality – SDG #5

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

4:00 pm – 5:30pm

Lisner Auditorium

800 21st St NW, Washington, DC 20052

This panel aims to build a greater understanding of the power of public-private partnership investments and their ability to impact and accelerate change in support of SDG #5.

The program will provide a forum for exchange on global best practices related to education, healthcare, access to capital/business and leadership.

Please also join us for a networking reception immediately following the panel session.

MODERATOR:
Ambassador Melanne Verveer
Co-founder Seneca Women

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie von Friedeburg
Chief Operating Officer, International Finance Corporation
Jane Fraser
CEO of Latin America, Citi
Julie Monaco
Global Head of Public Sector Coverage, Citi
Henriette Kolb
Manager, Gender Business Department, International Finance Corporation
Kathryn Kaufman
Managing Director for Global Women’s Initiatives, Overseas Private Investment Corporation
Jacqueline Caglia
Director of Communications and US Programs, Merck
Jill Miller
Chief Program and Administrative Officer, Girl Rising
Anna Falth
Senior Programme Manager of the WE EMPOWER – G7, UN Women

This event is co-sponsored by Citi and the International Finance Corporation. 

IMF October 2019 World Economic Outlook

Friday, November 1, 2019
9:30a.m. – 12:15p.m.
Lindner Family Commons (6th Floor)
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

Schedule of Events 

9:00 a.m. – Breakfast and Registration

9:30 a.m. – Opening Remarks
                     James Foster, Director, Institute for International Economic Policy,
                    GWU

9:45 a.m. – Chapter 1:Global Prospects and Policies
                     Presenter: Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti

10:15 a.m. – Coffee Break

10:30 a.m. – Chapter 2: Closer Together or Further Apart? Subnational Regional
                     Disparities and Adjustment in Advanced Economies

                     Presenter: Natalija Novta
                     Discussant: Ryan Nunn

Chapter 2 of the latest World Economic Outlook examines the rise in within-country regional disparities in economic performance across advanced economies.  The chapter explores how lagging regions differ from the rest, in terms of demographics, labor market outcomes, sectoral labor productivity and sectoral employment. It also explores how regions adjust to trade and technology shocks, comparing lagging to other regions.

11:15 a.m. – Coffee Break

11:30 a.m. – Chapter 3: Reigniting Growth in Emerging Market and Low-Income
                     Economies: What Role for Structural Reforms?

                     Presenter: Cian Ruane
                     Discussant: Danny Leipziger

The forthcoming IMF World Economic Outlook analytical chapter provides new evidence on the short-to-medium-term effects of reforms, based on a newly constructed database of reforms in domestic and external finance, trade, labor and product markets. The chapter discusses sources of cross-country heterogeneity in reform payoffs, including the role of governance and informality in mediating the gains from reforms, and  political economy issues related to reform implementation.

12:15 p.m. – Concluding Remarks

12:30 p.m. –  Lunch

 

The Venezuelan Migration Crisis: its Human and Economic Faces

Wednesday, November 13, 2019
5:30 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.* 
Linder Family Commons, Room 602
Elliot School of International Affairs
1957 E St NW, Washington, DC 20052

*Food and beverages will be available before the event at 5:15 pm

With a repressive regime and a collapsing economy driving millions of people out of Venezuela, the hemisphere is faced with the ramifications of this massive exodus. The tragic impact on the lives of Venezuelans living as refugees and migrants combined with the economic costs for the receiving countries makes this a crisis that is screaming for greater attention. This panel will examine these two different, yet overlapping, components by looking at the economic and human faces of this migration crisis. This discussion will be led by the following speakers:
 
Moderator/Commentator: Marie Price, Professor of Geography and International Affairs, George Washington University (GWU)
Oscar Valencia, Lead Specialist at the Fiscal Management Division of the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB)
Francisco Quintana, Director of the Venezuelan Human Mobility Program and the Andean, North-American and Caribbean Region of the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL)

This event is co-sponosored by the Latin American & Hemispheric Studies Program (LAHSP), the Institute for International Economic Policy (IIEP at GWU), the International Development Studies Program (IDS), and LATAM@GW.

The Digital Revolution and the State: The Great Reversal

William H. Janeway

Senior Advisor and Managing Director, Warburg Pincus

Friday, October 12, 2018

1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.


Lindner Commons, 6th floor
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

William H. Janeway is a Senior Advisor and Managing Director of Warburg Pincus.  He joined Warburg Pincus in 1988 and was responsible for building the information technology investment practice.  Previously, he was executive vice president and director at Eberstadt Fleming. Dr. Janeway is a director of Magnet Systems and O’Reilly Media. He is an Affiliated member of the Faculty of Economics at Cambridge University.

Dr. Janeway is a co-founder and member of the board of governors of the Institute for New Economic Thinking.  He is a member of the board of directors of the Social Science Research Council and of the Field Institute for Research in the Mathematical Sciences and of the Advisory Board of the Princeton Bendheim Center for Finance.  He is a member of the management committee of the Cambridge-INET Institute, University of Cambridge and a Member of the Board of Managers of the Cambridge Endowment for Research in Finance (CERF).  He is the author of Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy: Reconfiguring the Three-Player Game between Markets, Speculators, and the State, the 2nd edition of the book initially published by Cambridge University Press in November 2012.

Dr. Janeway received his doctorate in economics from Cambridge University where he was a Marshall Scholar. He was valedictorian of the class of 1965 at Princeton University.

William H Janeway

A Fresh Look at Digital Trade in North America

Susan Ariel Aaronson

Research Professor of International Affairs, The George Washington University

Jessica Nicholson

Department of Commerce

A Fresh Look at Digital Trade in North America

Friday, December 1, 2017

12:00 to 2:00pm

 

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

While TPP has the first binding language in its e-commerce chapter, NAFTA could be the first digital economy trade agreement designed to facilitate data-driven sectors such as the cloud, AI, and the Internet of Things. The Institute for International Economic Policy (IIEP) and the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program (LAHS) at the George Washington University as well as the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) and the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) present a free event on the data-driven economy in North America. To read Susan Ariel Aaronson’s paper, please click here.

Agenda
Panel 1: Measuring the North American Digital Economy
  • Speaker: Jessica Nicholson, Department of Commerce
  • Commentary by:
    • Martha Lawless, USITC
    • Jordan Khan, Embassy of Canada
    • Nicholas Bramble, Google
  • Moderator: Carl Schonander, Software & Information Industry Association
Panel 2: A Comprehensive Approach to Digital Trade in NAFTA 2.0
  • Speaker: Professor Susan Ariel Aaronson
  • Commentary by:
    • Dan Ciuriak, Centre for International Governance Innovation
    • Guillermo Malpica Soto, Embassy of Mexico
  • Moderator: Dan Ikenson, Cato Institute

For more information, please contact Kyle Renner at iiep@gwu.edu or 202-994-5320.

EGAP Evidence Summit on Elections and Political Accountability

Friday, June 9, 2017

9:30am to 3:300pm

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

You’re invited to an Evidence Summit on Elections and Political Accountability, sponsored by the Evidence in Governance and Politics (EGAP)research network. The event will take place on Friday, June 9, 2017 from 9:30am – 3:30pm at The Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University. Lunch will be provided for free; please RSVP using the free ticket option. (If you work for an organization that prevents you from accepting a free lunch, we have provided an at-cost ticket option that allows you to pay for your meal.)

EGAP researchers will be on hand to showcase six new field experimental studies that were carried out in coordination, all of which examine the consequences of making voters more informed about their politicians. EGAP will also present the integrated results from the six studies. This research is part of EGAP’s Metaketa Initiative, which is a new grant-making model designed to foster innovation and cumulative learning through simultaneous replication or research across multiple contexts. In addition, EGAP will use the event to study the potential utility of research for policymakers and practitioners.

Please RSVP, save the date on your calendars, and forward this notification to your colleagues!

Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law

Since 2002, the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law at Stanford University has collaborated widely with academics, policymakers and practitioners around the world to advance knowledge about the conditions for and interactions among democracy, broad-based economic development, human rights, and the rule of law.

Evidence in Governance and Politics

Evidence in Governance and Politics (EGAP) is a cross-disciplinary network of researchers and practitioners united by a focus on experimental research and dedicated to generating and disseminating rigorous evidence on topics of governance, politics, and institutions. EGAP seeks to forge partnerships between researchers and practitioners committed to understanding the politics of global development, advancing evidence-based policy making, and improving the quality of empirical research in the social sciences.

New Avenues to Govern Cross-Border Information Flows

Monday, November 14th, 2016

12:00 to 2:00pm

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

Cross-border data flows are the life-blood of an integrated world economy.  They support manufacturing and service supply chains and enable the flow of diverse and innovative goods and services to customers all over the world. But domestic policies must allow for these flows.  In the last several years, we have seen increasing attempts to close down the flow of information across borders – through requirements for domestic location of computer facilities and explicit bans on the transfer of data into or out of countries.  While domestic policy space must be large enough to permit legitimate regulations such as privacy and consumer protection, it should also ensure that these measures are no more restrictive than necessary to accomplish these purposes. The TPP was the first trade agreement to include binding provisions regarding these flows, but it has not yet been approved by any government.  But there are additional avenues to discuss cross-border data flows. They include:

  •  the Trade in Services Agreement being negotiated at the WTO
  • the WTO E-Commerce working group
  • bilateral discussions, discussions and resolutions at meetings of international economic leaders such as the G7 and the G20.  Herein we focus on what’s happening at the multilateral level at the WTO.

Join us for a discussion with a panel of experts and advocates on these avenues.

The Institute for International Economic Policy, along with the sponsorship of the Software and Information Industry Association, is hosting a panel discussion on November 14 as part of our continuing work on digital trade.  You are invited to bring your own lunch to enjoy during the panel.

Speakers will include:

  • Sam Dupont,  Director for Digital Trade, USTR
  • Michael Joseph FerrantinoWorld Bank
  • Carl SchonanderSenior Director International Policy, SIIA
  • Deborah JamesDirector, International Programs, Center for Economic and Policy Research
Moderator: Research Professor and Cross-disciplinary Fellow Susan AaronsonPh.D. GWU

Cosponsored by the Washington D.C. Chapter of the Internet Society

Internet Governance Forum USA 2015

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Marvin Center Grand Ballroom
800 21st Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

The IGF-USA 2015 was a full-day conference that brought together thought leaders from across the Internet multi-stakeholder community to highlight and engage in discussions about key issues that will drive the future of the Internet.

Topics

  • Encryption, Backdoors, Security and Privacy
  • The Politics of Innovation: Can the Internet Spur Too Much Disruption?
  • Truth and Trolls: Dealing with Toxic Speech while Protecting Free Speech Online
  • The state of digital rights and Free Expression Online
  • Critical Internet Resources: An update on progress and challenges remaining for the transition of IANA stewardship and enhancing ICANN accountability.
  • Enhancing Multistakeholder Cooperation
  • Internet of Things
  • The Digital Trade Imbalance: There is an imbalance in trade strategies between the US and many of its trade partners
  • Connecting the Next Billion

Confirmed keynotes

  • Catherine A. Novelli – Under Secretary of State & Senior Coordinator for International Information Technology Diplomacy
  • Ambassador Daniel A. Sepulveda – Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and U.S. Coordinator for International Communications and Information Policy
  • Lawrence E. Strickling – Assistant Secretary for Communications and Information and Administrator, National Telecommunications and Information Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce
  • Vint Cerf – Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist, Google
  • Steve Crocker – Chairman of the Board of Directors, ICANN
  • Kathryn Brown – President and CEO, The Internet Society

For more information, please contact Kyle Renner at iiep@gwu.edu or 202-994-5320.

Co-Sponsored by:

ARIN
ICANN
Public Interest Registry
Microsoft
NetChoice
Software and Information Industry Association

Disney
The Internet Society
Verisign
Internet Infrastructure Coalition
Verizon
Wiley Rein

Videos from the Forum

Welcome Remarks

 

Keynote by Larry Strickling

Keynote Conversation with Vinton Cerf and Steve Crocker, moderated by Nancy Scola

Breakout Session – Critical Internet Resources: An update on progress and challenges remaining for the transition of IANA stewardship and enhancing ICANN accountability

Keynote remarks by Julie Zoller – Deputy Coordinator, International Communications and Information Policy, U.S. Department of State

Keynote remarks by Kathryn Brown – President and CEO, The Internet Society

Breakout Session – Maintaining Trust Online: Cybersecurity, Encryption, Backdoors, and Privacy

Keynote Session – “Connecting the World”

Plenary – Connecting the Next Billion

Closing Plenary – Breakout Summaries

The Future of the Internet in the Wake of Charlie Hebdo and Increased Government Surveillance Online

Monday, May 18, 2015

Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

Governments have a special responsibility among stakeholders to make the Internet secure. However, the Snowden revelations revealed that many governments, including the US, use the Internet to monitor, spy on and attack other governments, organizations, individuals and businesses. In March, we also learned that that China is using the Great Cannon, a new malware tool to censor information. These revelations have stimulated a global backlash against pervasive Government data collection, Internet surveillance, and government use of malware. Netizens are increasingly worried about Internet stability and security.

Our panel will discuss how increasing surveillance and use of malware could impact the future of the Internet, including:

  • Increased pressure from law enforcement for backdoors to encryption;
  • Increased calls for data localization (as in France);
  • International pressure influencing the IANA transfer;
  • Less legal emphasis/protections on privacy at national levels;
  • Less trust in government policies and strategies to maintain Internet stability
  • The threat of Internet fragmentation.

Panelists:

Bruce Schneier, Security Technologist and Author. Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologist, called a “security guru” by The Economist. He is the author of 12 books – including his latest best-seller Liars and Outliers: Enabling the Trust Society Needs to Survive – as well as hundreds of articles and essays, and many more academic papers. His influential newsletter “Crypto-Gram,” and his blog “Schneier on Security,” are read by over 250,000 people. He has testified before Congress, is a frequent guest on television and radio, served on several government technical committees, and is regularly quoted in the press.

Chris Riley, Senior Policy Manager, Mozilla. M. Chris Riley is a Senior Policy Engineer at Mozilla, working to advance the open Internet and Web through public policy analysis and advocacy, strategic planning, coalition building, and community engagement. Prior to joining Mozilla, Chris worked as a program manager at the U.S. Department of State on Internet freedom, a policy counsel with the non-profit public interest organization Free Press, and an attorney-advisor at the Federal Communications Commission. Chris holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Johns Hopkins University and a J.D. from Yale Law School. He has published scholarship on topics including innovation policy, cognitive framing, graph drawing, and distributed load balancing.

Organizers:

This event is organized by Dr. Susan Aaronson and Kyle Renner of the Institute for International Economic Policy and David Vyorst of the Greater Washington DC Chapter of the Internet Society and is part of a larger seminar series. We are grateful to an anonymous donor for their support of these seminars, and would also like to thank our co-sponsors at the Cyber Security Policy and Research Institute.

The DC Chapter of the Internet Society (ISOC-DC) aims to build a better internet for the Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Virginia community. The chapter strives to promote open development, evolution, and use of the Internet for the benefit of people worldwide. ISOC-DC brings together individuals from within the DC area, as well as abroad, to engage in events, discussions, and information exchanges to advance these goals.

For more information, please contact Kyle Renner at iiep@gwu.edu or 202-994-5320.

Cosponsored by:

Working for All? New Ideas and Innovative Strategies to Enhance Economic and Social Benefits in Trade Agreements

Thursday, May 14, 2015

9:00am to 5:00pm

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

How Can TTIP benefit workers and promote employment? Read Professor Susan Aaronson’s latest paper.

The US, Canada, and Mexico agreed to the first labor rights provisions in NAFTA, which went into force in 1993. Some 22 years later, the bulk of the world’s economies, from Albania to Zimbabwe, participate in a trade arrangement with labor rights provisions, whether through a free trade agreement, a preferential trade arrangement, or in an investment agreement. Since 2008, 41 out of 93 new trade agreements included labor provisions and over 60 per cent of the trade agreements concluded in 2013 and 2014 included labor provisions.

But there is a lot that we do not know about these agreements. Scholars, policymakers, labor rights activists, and the business community do not know if these provisions are effective in improving working conditions. Moreover, in instances where they have been effective it is unclear why and what has been the role of the different stakeholders?

How can trade agreements promote employment, enhance the link between economic and social benefits and achieve sustainable development? How can the interconnectedness between economic, social and environmental objectives be protected and promoted? Which complementary policies are key to inclusive growth and help in capitalizing opportunities from trade openness?

For more information, please contact Kyle Renner at iiep@gwu.edu or 202-994-5320.

 

Co-Sponsored by:

View the Schedule

Conference Agenda

8:30 – 9:00 – Registration and Breakfast

9:00 – 9:30 – Welcome and Opening Remarks

  • Dr. Jay Shambagh (Director Institute for International Economic Policy)
  • Nancy Donaldson (ILO Washington DC)
  • Carol Pier (Deputy Undersecretary, International Labor Affairs, U.S. Department of Labor)

9:30 – 11:00 – Session I: Decent work for all? How to bridge the gap between the social and economic dimensions of trade agreements?

  • Moderator: Marva Corley (ILO)
  • Rudi Delarue (European Commission)
  • Lance Compa (ILR, Cornell University)

11:00 – 11:15 – Coffee Break

11:15 – 12:45 – Session II: Roundtable: To ensure that trade agreements work for all, can we achieve coherence within and among trade agreements?

  • Moderator: Anil Verma (University of Toronto)
  • Pierre Bouchard (Bilateral and Regional Labor Affairs, Canada)
  • Silvia Formentini (Trade and Sustainable Development, EC)
  • Kevin Kolben (Rutgers University)
  • Pablo Lazo Grandi (Permanent Mission of Chile to UN in Geneva)

12:45 – 2:00 – Lunch

2:00 – 3:30 – Session III: What evidence do we have that trade agreements are working for all? How do we measure the effectiveness of labor provisions in FTAs?

  • Moderator: Jan Van Hove (University of Leuven)
  • Raymond Robertson (Macalester College)
  • Bill Gibson (University of Vermont)
  • Werner Raza (Austrian Foundation of Development Research)

3:30 – 3:45 – Coffee Break

3:45 – 5:15 – Session IV: Roundtable: What innovative ideas with regard to the promotion of labour rights and improvement of working conditions can be explored to ensure that trade agreements do work for all?

  • Moderator: Susan Aaronson (Elliott School of International Affairs, GWU)
  • Ms. Xiaoyan Qian (Chinese Embassy, Washington DC)
  • Tonia Novitz (University of Bristol)
  • Thomas Zielke (RGIT)
  • Ariel Meyerstein (USCIB)
  • Celeste Drake (AFL-CIO)

5:15 – 5:30 – Closing Remarks

The Future of the Global Internet for Business and Entrepreneurs

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

4:00 to 6:00pm

 

601 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (North Building, Suite 900)
Note: The entrance to the building is on Indiana Avenue, next to Fiola restaurant.

 

Please join the Global Innovation Forum, on December 2 for a discussion about the future of the global Internet in partnership with Cisco, the Institute for International Economic Policy at George Washington University and Tech Cocktail. The forum will feature a conversation with:

Shawn Chang, Former Democratic Chief Counsel, Communications and Technology, House Energy and Commerce Committee
Gordon Goldstein, Managing Director and Head of External Affairs, SilverLake
Christopher Mondini, Vice President, ICANN Global Stakeholder Engagement for North America and Global Business
Robert Pepper, Vice President, Technology Policy, Cisco
John Williams, General Counsel, U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation

Discussants will address —

  • The impact of the global Internet on businesses and startups
  • How the Internet governance debate can affect access to the global marketplace
  • The role of ICANN in Internet governance
  • The conversation about  the open Internet and Internet governance issues in Congress

An informal networking reception will follow the discussion.

Human Rights, Accountability, and Internet Governance: A Panel Discussion

Read the event summary here

Monday, November 17, 2014

12:30 to 7:00pm – Reception to Follow

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

Change is coming to Internet governance. But change is scary. It involves compromises, and may yield a less accountable approach. Moreover, the US Government wants any changes to protect human rights, Internet openness and stability, and the multistakeholder model. This free luncheon seminar considers how recent proposed changes in Internet governance will affect human rights online and how Internet governance institutions and processes might be made more accountable to netizens.

Sizing Up the Digital Economy: A Panel Discussing the Digital Economy and International Trade

Monday, April 23, 2018

5:30 to 7:00pm – Reception to Follow

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052
The Institute for International Economic Policy at the George Washington University and the Greater Washington DC Chapter of the Internet Society invite you to a panel analyzing the new report of the US International Trade Commission (ITC) on the “digital economy.” The Senate Finance Committee requested that ITC analyze the economic impact of the digital economy. They also requested that ITC examine digital protectionism around the world.

The ITC found that “digital trade, through the combined effects of the Internet in enhancing productivity and lowering international trade costs in certain digitally intensive industries, has resulted in increase in U.S. gross domestic product of some four percent.”

James Stamps, Project Leader, will discuss the ITC Report. He will be followed by a panel of four commentators:

• Michael Mandel, Chief Economic Strategist of the Progressive Policy Institute ,will provide an economic assessment of the report.

• Jacquelynn Ruff, Vice President, International, of Verizon will provide a view from a leading Internet Service Provider (ISP).

• Linda Kinney, Senior Vice President, Motion Picture Association of America, will provide perspective from an association representing content providers.

• Usman Ahmed, Policy Counsel of eBay, will provide analysis from an e-commerce company’s viewpoint.

This event is a brown bag lunch. Light refreshments will be provided by the Progressive Policy Institute.

Internet Governance Forum USA 2014

Cosponsored by ISOC-DC

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

8:30am to 7:00pm – Reception to Follow

Marvin Center, 800 21st Street NW
Grand Ballroom, 3rd Floor
Washington, DC 20052

The IGF-USA provides a domestic forum in the US for civil society, government, technologists, research scientists, the media, industry and academia, and other interested communities to engage in dialogue about development of best practices for multistakeholder governance and help move Internet policy forward.

IGF-USA 2014 seeks to help establish creative partnerships and to build a US based coalition to generate momentum around priority Internet governance issues and practices under consideration.

Schedule of event is available here .

Live streaming of event is available here .

Scenarios for the Future of Internet Governance

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

9:30am to 2:00pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Institute for International Economic Policy
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

Seminar on Human Rights and Internet Governance

Scenarios for the Future of Internet Governance

April 30, 2013

Agenda and Bios available here.

Panel 1: What is the IANA Function? What led to the US decision to reduce its role in IANA? What are the risks and opportunities associated with this fundamental change?

  • Fiona Alexander – Office of International Affairs, NTIA, US Department of Commerce
  • Pat Kane – Senior Vice President, Naming and Directory Services, Verisign
  • Richard Jimmerson – Chief Information Officer, ARIN
  • Steve DelBianco – Executive Director, NetChoice
  • Milton Mueller – Professor at Syracuse University School of Information Studies
  • Moderator – Tim Lordan – Executive Director, Internet Education Foundation

 

Panel 2: Possible scenarios for the future of the IANA functions – what are the implications for Internet governance?

  • Christopher Mondini – VP, Stakeholder Engagement North America & Global Business Engagement, ICANN
  • Raquel Gatto – Chapter Development Manager, the Americas, ISOC
  • Beatrice Covassi – First Counsellor, Digital Economy, EU Delegation to the United States
  • Derrick Cogburn – Associate Professor of International Relations at the School of International Service at American University
  • Becky Burr – Deputy General Counsel and Chief Privacy Officer at NeuStar, Inc.
  • Moderator – Roger Cochetti – Principal at RJC Associates

Who is Bashing Whom? China, Cyber-attack, Democracy, and Retaliation

Moderator: Dr. Susan Ariel Aaronson

A luncheon forum: March 22, GWU, 12-2
Elliott School Commons, 6th fl, 1957 E Street, NW
Visit the conference website here.

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

About the Event

On January 31, The New York Times, America’s paper of record, made front page news. Several months after it published several articles delineating the financial holdings of the families of Chinese leaders, the Times reported that the Chinese military had hacked into its computers, inserted malware and stolen its employees’ e-mail account passwords. Soon thereafter, The Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Bloomberg, Voice of America and other media outlets publicly claimed their computers were also allegedly hacked by Chinese citizens.

Many Americans were outraged and expressed concerns about the importance of cyber-security for the fourth estate, which must protect the privacy of sources, ensure freedom of the press, and play such an important role in American democracy. But the incidents also raised questions of governance. How should the US respond to such cyber-attacks when it too is attacking? Congressman Mike Rodgers, Chair of the House Intelligence Committee, called for retaliation. However, retaliation is unlikely to build greater support for shared international cyber norms.

The event, organized by the Trade and Internet Governance Project of GWU, and the Minerva Initiative of the Department of Defense, examined the hacking from several different perspectives: cyber-security, economics, trade, human rights, and global governance.

Speakers:

Ellen Nakashima, The Washington Post
Dr. Irving Lachow, Director, Technology and Security, Center for a New American Security
Delphine Halgand, Washington Office Director, Reporters without Borders
Grady Summers, Vice President of Mandiant Security
Michael Nelson, Bloomberg Government

The State of the World Economy

Olivier Blanchard

Chief Economist of the International Monetary Fund

Co-sponsored by the George Washington University Department of Economics

RSVP to tiny.cc/IIEPPolicyForumRSVP

View the presentation in pdf here.

Thursday, March 7, 2013

6:30 to 8:00pm – Reception to Follow

 

Harry Harding Auditorium
1957 E St., NW, Room 213
Elliott School of International Affairs
George Washington University
Washington, DC

The Institute for International Economic Policy and the George Washington University Department of Economics are proud to present Olivier Blanchard, Chief Economist of the International Monetary Fund, to present a policy address regarding current issues in international financial policy. Dr. Blanchard is also a professor of economics at his alma mater, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a macroeconomist who has worked on a wide variety of issues including, the role of monetary policy, the nature of speculative bubbles, the nature of the labor market and the determinants of unemployment, and transition in former communist countries. He is a fellow and Council member of the Econometric Society, a past vice president of the American Economic Association, and a member of the American Academy of the Sciences.

Olivier Blanchard

“Can Trade Policies and Agreements Advance Internet Freedom?”

Hosuk Lee-Makiyama (Director, ECIPE); Susan Aaronson (George Washington University); and others

 

Co-sponsors:
Institute for International Economic Policy, National War College, MacArthur Foundation, Computer and Communications Industry Association, Heinrich Boell Stiftung, GW-Center for International Business Education and Research and the Software and Information Industry Association

For more information, please visit the blog of the Project on Trade Agreements and Internet governance at tradeandinternet.wordpress.com

Thursday, December 6, 2012

8:15am – 3:30pm

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

TAIG hosted this free conference, providing a wide range of insight into the potential and pitfalls of trade policy to regulate the Internet. Panels included: views from the US, EU, and Canada; a discussion of privacy, intellectual property rights, and Internet freedom; and new ideas to promote trade and Internet freedom. Lee Hibbard from the Council of Europe offered “A Human Rights Perspective”, and Andrew McLaughlin of betaworks gave the luncheon keynote address on “The Future of Internet Freedom”. The full agenda is here. The conference benefited from the support of the John and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Heinrich Böll Foundation, the Computer and Communications Industry Association, the Software and Information Industry Association, the Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) at GWU, the National War College and the Minvera Initiative.

Our policy brief, “Can Trade Policy Set Information Free? Trade Agreements, Internet Governance, and Internet Freedom” is here.

Click here to view Dr. Aaronson’s slides (requires Flash)

 

Can Trade Agreements Facilitate the Free Flow of Information? The Trans-Pacific Partnership as a Case Study

Organized by
The Institute for International Economic Policy

In partnership with:
The Computer Communications Industry Association
The Heinrich Boell Foundation
and The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Friday, September 21, 2012

12:00 to 1:30pm – Beverages will be provided

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

Jonathan McHale, Deputy Assistant United States Trade Representative for Telecommunications and Electronic Commerce Policy, Office of the United States Trade Representative
Jayme White, Staff Director, Subcommittee on International Trade, Customs and Global Competitiveness, United States Senate
Usman Ahmed, Policy Counsel, eBay, Inc.
Rashni Rangnath, Director, Global Knowledge Initiative at Public Knowledge

 

President Obama has described the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) as the first 21st century trade agreement. These negotiations are particularly important to advocates of an open Internet. The U.S. wants its TPP negotiating partners to accept language designed to protect intellectual property online, to encourage regulatory transparency for Internet governance, and to ensure open access to digital goods, applications, consumers, devices, networks, and information. Other governments have a different vision. Currently, although several non-profit U.S. bodies oversee technical specifications and the domain name system, international multi-stakeholder groups collaborate to maintain the free flow of information on the web. However, Russia, China and several other nations want to use “the monitoring and supervisory capabilities of the International Telecommunication Union,” a U.N. agency, to regulate the Internet. They believe the current system is too ad hoc, U.S.-centric, and does not allow national policymakers to restrict the free flow of information when such officials deem it appropriate. This discussion will examine what the U.S. is proposing. Representatives from the private sector, the Internet advocacy community, and the Senate Finance Committee will present their views on the implications of these provisions for the future of the Internet.

Getting Rights…Right: How Companies are Implementing the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights

In partnership with:
U.S. Institute for Peace
U.N. Global Compact U.S. Network
Ford Motor Company
Heinrich Böll Stiftung North America
GW-CIBER

 

For a policy brief created from the conference outcomes, click here.
Download the full document here.

 

To mark International Human Rights Day 2011, George Washington University, the UN Global Compact US Network, and the US Institute of Peace hosted a 1 day conference on the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. These principles, approved by the UN Human Rights Council in June, are designed to help business monitor its human rights impact. These guidelines clarified both the human rights responsibilities of states and firms and made them clear and actionable. Our speakers, representing business, civil society, the US Government, and academia, focused on practical approaches to implementing the Guiding Principles (the GPs).

Thursday, December 8, 2011

9:00am to 4:30pm

 

Grand Ballroom, 3rd Floor
Marvin Center
800 21st Street, NW
Schedule

Thursday, December 8, 2011
9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Grand Ballroom, 3rd Floor
Marvin Center
800 21st Street, NW

 

9:00-9:10 – Welcoming Remarks

  1. Stephen C. Smith (GWU)
    Dave Berdish (Ford Motor Company)

9:10-9:45 – David Arkless President and CEO, Global Corporate and Government Affairs, Manpower, “Why Firms Should Advance Human Rights: Manpower’s approach”

 

9:45-11:15 – Panel 1 – Addressing the Problems of Slavery and Human Trafficking

Moderator: Pamela Passman, President and CEO, Center for Responsible Enterprise And Trade (CREATe)

  1. Brenda Schultz, Manager, Responsible Business, Carlson Hotels Worldwide
  2. Samir Goswami, Director of Corporate Responsibility, Rule of Law, Lexis Nexis
  3. Jean Baderscheider, Vice President, Global Procurement, Exxon Mobil
  4. Jean Baderscheider – Exxon Mobil
  5. Karen Stauss, Director of Programs, Free the Slaves

11:15-11:30 – Coffee Break

 

11:30-12:00 – General Discussion: What should policymakers do to encourage adoption of the GPs?

led by Susan Aaronson

  1. Procurement set asides?
  2. Education?
  3. Corporate governance rules?

12:00-1:00 – Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs, Maria Otero

  1. The Department of State’s Approach to the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights

1:00-2:00 – Luncheon Keynote

  1. Ursula Wynhoven (General Counsel, UN Global Compact) “The Case for Supporting Human Rights”
  2. Ursula Wynhoven – United Nations
  3. Gerald Pachoud, Senior Advisor to the Assistant Secretary General, UN and former Senior Advisor, Special Representative on Business and Human Rights) “Business and Human Rights… and States”

 

2:05-3:35 – Panel 2 – How Business Should Operate in Conflict Zones

Moderator: Raymond Gilpin, Director, Center for Sustainable Economies, U.S. Institute of Peace

  1. Bennett Freeman, Senior Vice President for Social research and Policy, Calvert Group
  2. Bennett Freeman – GE Audio
  3. Charlotte Wolff, Corporate Responsibility Manager, Arcellor Mittal
  4. Charlotte Wolff – Arcellor Mittal Audio
  5. Olav Ljosne, Regional Director of Communications, Africa, Shell Corporation
  6. Olav Ljosne – Shell Corporation Audio
  7. Jenny Vaughan, Program Officer, Conflict Management, Mercy Corps
  8. Jenny Vaughan – Mercy Corps
  9. Jenny Vaughan – Mercy Corps Audio
  10. Panel 2 – Entire Audio
  11. Panel 2 – Discussion Audio

3:35-3:50 – Coffee Break

 

3:50-5:20 – Panel 3: General Implementation of the Guiding Principles: Is it difficult to get buy in? Is it costly? What recommendations or roadblocks have you found?

Moderator: Susan Aaronson (GWU)

  1. Mark Nordstrom, Senior Labor & Employment Counsel, General Electric
  2. Mark Nordstrom – Fordham University
  3. Mark Nordstrom – Fordham University Audio
  4. Dave Berdish, Manager of Sustainable Business Development, Ford Motor Company
  5. Dave Berdish – Ford Motors
  6. Dave Berdish – Ford Motor Company Audio
  7. Motoko Aizawa, Sustainability Advisor, International Finance Corporation
  8. Meg Roggensack, Senior Advisor for Business and Human Rights, Human Rights First
  9. Panel 3 – Discussion Audio

5:20 – Conference End

 

Conference organized by:

 

  • Dr. Susan Aaronson and Kyle Renner, GWU
  • Dr. Raymond Gilpin and Amanda Mayoral, USIP
  • Thanks too to Ursula Wynhoven and the staff of the UN Global Compact for their help.

 

 

Ford Motor Company and the Heinrich Böll Foundation provided generous financial support to ensure a free conference.

Euro at the Crossroads?

Fred Joutz

Professor of Economics and Director of the Research Program on Forecasting, GWU

Desmond Lachman

Resident Fellow, American Enterprise Institute

Holger Wolf

Associate Professor, BMW Center for German and European Studies, Georgetown University

Audio of “Euro at the Crossroads?” can be found here.

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

12:00 to 1:30pm

 

Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street, NW
Washington, DC 20052

Corruption and Conflict

Organized by
The Institute for International Economic Policy
and
Transparency International’s (UK) International Defence & Security Programme

To listen to the podcast, click here.
To view the PowerPoint, click here.

Wednesday October 26, 2011

12:30 to 2:00pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Suite 505
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

Mark Pyman (Head of Transparency International, the UK’s Defence & Security Programme)
Sir Stewart Eldon (Senior Adviser to TI-DSP and former UK Permanent Representative to NATO)

Corruption is both a symptom of and a cause of conflict. As example, many Afghans initially welcomed the Taliban because they promised to restore order and reduce corruption. Policymakers increasingly recognize that if they want to create clean and effective state institutions and sustain peace, they must also counter corruption. Without addressing corruption, officials may be unable to restore state authority and deliver services to war-ravaged communities. According to the UNDP, several factors shape the interaction of corruption and peace: how a peace agreement is formed; the legacy of wartime corruption; the circumstances and potential turmoil of transitional governments; and resource wealth and potential for exploitation. Transparency International UK’s Defense & Security Program, based in London, has been studying how to counter corruption in conflict and post-conflict environments to create a roadmap towards stability and a well-functioning state. Pyman and Eldon will discuss the Program’s emerging findings, examine case studies such as that of Afghanistan, and address questions.

Can Trade Agreements Facilitate the Free Flow of Information: The Trans-Pacific Partnership as a Case Study

Organized by
The Institute for International Economic Policy

In partnership with:
The Computer Communications Industry Association
The Heinrich Boell Foundation
and The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

12:00 to 1:30pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th Floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

Jonathan McHale, Deputy Assistant United States Trade Representative for Telecommunications and Electronic Commerce Policy, Office of the United States Trade Representative
Jayme White, Staff Director, Subcommittee on International Trade, Customs and Global Competitiveness, United States Senate
Usman Ahmed, Policy Counsel, eBay, Inc.
Rashni Rangnath, Director, Global Knowledge Initiative at Public Knowledge

 

President Obama has described the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) as the first 21st century trade agreement. These negotiations are particularly important to advocates of an open Internet. The U.S. wants its TPP negotiating partners to accept language designed to protect intellectual property online, to encourage regulatory transparency for Internet governance, and to ensure open access to digital goods, applications, consumers, devices, networks, and information. Other governments have a different vision. Currently, although several non-profit U.S. bodies oversee technical specifications and the domain name system, international multi-stakeholder groups collaborate to maintain the free flow of information on the web. However, Russia, China and several other nations want to use “the monitoring and supervisory capabilities of the International Telecommunication Union,” a U.N. agency, to regulate the Internet. They believe the current system is too ad hoc, U.S.-centric, and does not allow national policymakers to restrict the free flow of information when such officials deem it appropriate. This discussion will examine what the U.S. is proposing. Representatives from the private sector, the Internet advocacy community, and the Senate Finance Committee will present their views on the implications of these provisions for the future of the Internet.

Beverages will be provided.

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