Mardi Dungey Memorial Research Conference

Mardi Dungey Memorial Research Conference
Friday, February 21, 2020
8:00 am – 5:30 pm (Conference)
5:30pm – 7:30 pm (Reception)
Lindner Commons, Suite 602
1957 E St NW
Washington, D.C. 20052

On behalf of the Institute for International Economic Policy, the Research Program on Forecasting, the Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, University of Tasmania, and the Society for Nonlinear Dynamics and Econometrics, you are cordially invited to the Mardi Dungey Memorial Research Conference on February 21, 2020. The event is named in honor of Mardi Dungey, Professor of Economics and Finance at the University of Tasmania, Adjunct Professor and Program Director, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, ANU, Senior Research Associate at the Centre for Financial Analysis and Policy at Cambridge University, and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.

Agenda

8:00am- 8:45am: Breakfast

8:45am – 9:10am

Introduction, Stephen Smith, Chair, Department of Economics and Professor of Economics and International Affairs, Institute for International Economic Policy, GWU

Opening Remarks, Tara Sinclair, George Washington University

9:10 – 9:30am: A Panel on Mardi Dungey’s Contributions

Vanessa Smith, University of York

Renee Fry-McKibbin, Australian National University

Warwick McKibbin, Australian National University

Chaired by: Renee Fry-McKibbin, Australian National University

9:30 – 10:30am

Econometrics of Option Pricing with Stochastic Volatility, Eric Renault, University of Warwick

Chaired by: Vance Martin, University of Melbourne

10:30 – 11:00am: Coffee Break

11:00 – 11:45am

Leaning Against the Wind: An Empirical Cost-Benefit Analysis, Gaston Gelos, International Monetary Fund

Chaired by: Tara Sinclair, George Washington University

11:45am – 12:30pm

The Gains from Catch-up for China and the U.S.: An Empirical Framework, Denise Osborn, University of Manchester

Chaired by: Simon van Norden, HEC Montréal, CIREQ & CIRANO

12:30 – 1:30pm: Lunch Break

1:30 – 2:30pm

Measurement of Factor Strength: Theory and Practice, Hashem Pesaran, Cambridge University

Chaired by: Nigel Ray, International Monetary Fund

2:30 – 2:45pm: Coffee Break

2:45 – 3:30pm

Inflation: Expectations, Structural Breaks, and Global Factors, Pierre Siklos, Wilfrid Laurier University

Chaired by: Gerald Dwyer, Clemson University

3:30 – 4:15pm

Multivariate Trend-Cycle-Seasonal Decomposition with Correlated Innovations, Jing Tian, University of Tasmania

Chaired by: Edda Claus, Wilfrid Laurier University

4:15 – 4:30pm: Coffee Break

4:30 – 5:15pm

The Center and the Periphery: Two Hundred Years of International Borrowing Cycles, Graciela Kaminsky, George Washington University

Chaired by: Brenda Gonzalez-Hermosillo, International Monetary Fund

5:15 – 5:30pm: Closing Remarks

Marty Robinson, Australian Treasury

Vladimir Volkov, University of Tasmania

Warwick McKibbin, Australian National University

Chaired by: Renee Fry-McKibbin, Australian National University

5:30 – 7:30pm: Reception

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Digital Trade

Thursday, October 31, 2019
12:00 p.m.-1:30 p.m.

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW
Washington, D.C 20052

Data has become the most traded good and/or service across borders. The American economy is increasingly reliant on digital trade. But the US does not yet participate in any explicit binding digital trade agreements. Meanwhile, many countries have adopted policies that inhibit digital trade, including requirements that data be stored locally or restricting services provided by foreign firms. Such policies not only affect U.S. Internet and technology firms, but the users and small businesses that rely on an open digital environment.

There have been lots of panels on digital trade, but this event will provide an opportunity to better understand why data is governed in trade agreements, what are the barriers to digital trade, and how digital trade rules may affect important policy objectives such as internet openness, the gig economy, innovation, and national security.​

PANELISTS:
Matthew Reisman
Microsoft
Meredith Broadbent
Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)
Rachael Stelly
Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA)
Burcu Kilic
Public Citizen

MODERATOR:
Susan Aaronson
Research Professor, GWU and Director, Digital Trade and Data Governance Hub

This event is co-sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy (IIEP at GWU), the Digital Trade and Data Governance Hub, and the Internet Society DC (ISOC-DC). This event is also organized in conjunction with the Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA).

8th Annual Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) Conference

Friday, April 27, 2018

Inter-American Development Bank CR-200
1330 New York Avenue NW
Washington DC 20577

The Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) is a forum that highlights trade research at institutions in the Washington D.C. area. Its primary activity is sponsoring an annual research conference where scholars present their latest academic work. Researchers from George Washington University, American University, the Census Bureau, the Federal Reserve Board, Georgetown University, the Inter-American Development Bank, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the U.S. International Trade Commission, the University of Maryland, and the World Bank have all participated in the symposium.

Contact iiep@gwu.edu with any questions. Please note that WAITS conferences are open to the public but participants are asked to register here.

View the Schedule
8:15 – 8:50 AM: Continental Breakfast and Registration
8:50 – 9:00 AM: Opening Remarks
Antoni Estevadeordal, Manager, Integration and Trade Sector, Inter-American Development Bank
Mike Moore, George Washington University
9:00 – 9:45 AM: Policy Credibility and Firm Growth in the Global Economy
Nuno Limao, University of Maryland
Discussant: Luciana Juvenal, IMF
9:45 – 10:30 AM: Uncertainty and Trade Elasticities
Olga Timoshenko, George Washington University
Discussant: Ina Simonovska, University of Maryland
10:30 – 10:45 AM: Coffee Break
10:45 – 11:30 AM: Information and Exports: Firm-Level Evidence From an Online Platform
Christian Volpe Martincus, Inter-American Development Bank
Discussant: Maggie Chen, George Washington University
11:30 – 12:15 PM: The Impact of Trade on Managerial Incentives and Productivity
Cristina Tello-Trillo, U.S. Census Bureau
Discussant: Anna Maria Mayda, Georgetown University
12:15 – 1:00 PM: Investment Responses to Trade Liberalization: Evidence from U.S. Industries and Establishments
Justin Pierce, Federal Reserve Board
Discussant: Fariha Kamal, U.S. Census Bureau
1:00 – 2:00 PM: Lunch (Provided)
2:00 – 2:45 PM: Goods and Factor Market Integration: A Quantitative Assessment of the EU Enlargement
Fernando Parro, SAIS– Johns Hopkins University
Discussant: Mariano Somale, Federal Reserve Board
2:45 – 3:30 PM: Assessing Market (Dis) Integration in Pre-Modern China and Europe Dan Bernhofen, American University
Discussant: Paulo Bastos, World Bank
3:30 – 3:45 PM: Coffee Break
3:45 – 4:30 PM: The Trade Effects of the New Silk Road
Michele Ruta, World Bank
Discussant: Mauricio Mesquita Moreira, Inter-American Development Bank
4:30 – 5:15 PM: How Does Industry Comparative Advantage Affect Establishments?
Serge Shikher, USITC
Discussant: Kara Reynolds, American University
5:15 – 6:00 PM: Endogenous Trade Policy in a Global Value Chain: Evidence from Chinese Micro-level Processing Trade
Rod Ludema, Georgetown University
Discussant: Paul Piveteau, SAIS– Johns Hopkins University
6:00 – 6:15 PM: Closing Remarks
Aaron Flaaen, Federal Reserve Board
Christian Volpe Martincus, Inter-American Development Bank

George Washington University’s Institute for International Economic Policy, housed at the Elliott School of International Affairs, is dedicated to producing and disseminating high-quality non-partisan academic and policy relevant research on international economic policy. Areas of focus include international trade, international finance, and development economics.

Brazilian Trade Policy: Standards and Strategy

Aluisio De-Lima Campos

Adjunct Professor and Chairmain of the ABCI Institute – American University Washington College of Law

Diego Eugenio Pizeta

PhD Candidate in International Political Economy and Guest Researcher at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

 

Brazilian Trade Policy: Standards and Strategy

Join the Brazil Initiative for the panel:

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

7:00 to 9:00pm – Reception to Follow

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

A Fresh Look at Digital Trade in North America

Susan Ariel Aaronson

Research Professor of International Affairs, The George Washington University

Jessica Nicholson

Department of Commerce

A Fresh Look at Digital Trade in North America

Friday, December 1, 2017

12:00 to 2:00pm

 

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

While TPP has the first binding language in its e-commerce chapter, NAFTA could be the first digital economy trade agreement designed to facilitate data-driven sectors such as the cloud, AI, and the Internet of Things. The Institute for International Economic Policy (IIEP) and the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program (LAHS) at the George Washington University as well as the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) and the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) present a free event on the data-driven economy in North America. To read Susan Ariel Aaronson’s paper, please click here.

Agenda
Panel 1: Measuring the North American Digital Economy
  • Speaker: Jessica Nicholson, Department of Commerce
  • Commentary by:
    • Martha Lawless, USITC
    • Jordan Khan, Embassy of Canada
    • Nicholas Bramble, Google
  • Moderator: Carl Schonander, Software & Information Industry Association
Panel 2: A Comprehensive Approach to Digital Trade in NAFTA 2.0
  • Speaker: Professor Susan Ariel Aaronson
  • Commentary by:
    • Dan Ciuriak, Centre for International Governance Innovation
    • Guillermo Malpica Soto, Embassy of Mexico
  • Moderator: Dan Ikenson, Cato Institute

For more information, please contact Kyle Renner at iiep@gwu.edu or 202-994-5320.

NAFTA Renegotiation: International Trade and Arbitration Going Forward

A Panel on NAFTA Renegotiation

International Trade and Arbitration Going Forward

Thursday, November 16, 2017

12:00 to 1:30pm

 

George Washington University Law School
Tasher Great Room (Burns 101)
2000 H St NW
Washington, DC 20052

With the fifth round of NAFTA renegotiations set to commence on November 17, 2017, the Trump Administration’s objects for investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) in the final agreement have been front and center. Given the timeliness and the importance of the renegotiation efforts, the panelists will be in a unique position to discuss the merits of potential changes to the ISDS provisions as well as other aspects of the trade agreement.

Our panelists and moderator will discuss, among other things, potential changes to Chapter 11 ISDS provisions, the intersection of U.S. industry and ISDS, and substantive protections. The International Arbitration Student Association and International Law Society of The George Washington University Law School hopes that you will be able to join us for this panel discussion.

 

Moderator:

  • Steve Charnovitz (Professor, The George Washington University Law School) Professor Charnovitz is an associate professor at the GWU Law School. Prior to joining the Law School in 2004, Professor Charnovitz was the director of the Global Environment and Trade Study at Yale and from 1991-1995 he was the policy director at the U.S. Competitiveness Policy Council. Professor Charnovitz serves or has served on the editorial boards of the American Journal of international Law, the Journal of International Economic Law, and the World Trade Review. He is a member of the Council on Foreign relations and the American Law Institute. He has authored, co-authored, or edited more than 215 scholarly publications over his career and written multiple books on the topic of international trade law, the most recent being The Path of World Trade Law in the 21st Century.

Panelists:

  • James Mendenhall (Partner, Sidley Austin)Mr. Mendenhall is a partner in the International Arbitration and International Trade practice groups at Sidley Austin. He is the former General Counsel of the Office of the US Trade Representative where he represented US interests before the WTO and in NAFTA disputes. In this capacity he was the chief negotiator for the US in the Softwood Lumber negotiations with Canada and served as the USTR representative on the CFIUS. Mr. Mendenhall has represented clients in numerous international arbitration and invest-state proceedings under ICSID and UNCIRAL arbitration rules and routinely advises clients on international trade negotiations, trade policy, national security regulations, and legislative matters.
  • George Kalantzakis (Manager, International Government Affairs, Hess Corporation) Mr. Kalantzakis is the Manager of International Government Affairs at Hess Corporation, a Fortune 500 American based oil and gas company with global operations. Prior to joining Hess, Mr. Kalantzakis worked under the Chief Economist at the American Petroleum Institute. He received his graduate degree from The John Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Following graduation from SAIS, he received his MBA from John Hopkins.
  • Patrick Childress (Associate, Sidley Austin)Mr. Childress is an associate in the International Arbitration practice group at Sidley Austin. He focuses primarily on international dispute settlement including investment treaty arbitration and international commercial arbitration. He has represented investors and governments in proceedings before the ICSID as well as in arbitrations under the Arbitration Rules of the UNCITRAL, the International Chamber of Commerce, and the London Court of International Arbitration.
  • Todd Tucker (Fellow, Roosevelt Institute)Todd Tucker is a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute who specializes in economic governance, dispute settlement, and regulatory implications of international trade, investment, and tax treaties. He is a co-author of The Rise and Fall of Fast Track Trade Authority which explores the history of U.S. Executive-congressional relations on trade. He has authored more than 60 major reports and is often published and cited in and on CNN, NPR, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post for his expertise on the intersection of the domestic and global economy.

2017 Intensive Trade Seminar: Spring Session

Thursday, June 8, 2017

9:00am to 4:30pm – Reception to Follow

 

House of Sweden
2900 K Street NW
Washington, DC 20007

The WITA Intensive Trade Seminar (ITS) Spring Session provides an in-depth look into critical trade issues, and provides an overview of how the US Government formulates and enforces trade policy.

Along with the Fall ITS, these sessions provide a unique opportunity for attendees to increase their professional knowledge base and broaden their network of contacts by learning the nuts and bolts of trade policy from career trade policymakers from the US Government and Capitol Hill, the private sector, NGO’s, and other players in the trade policy arena.

The Intensive Trade Seminar addressed four important trade issues:

US Trade Law

Speakers including Stacy J. Ettinger, Partner at K&L Gates LLP and Hon. F. Scott Kieff, Commissioner at U.S. International Trade Commission, discussed what we might expect to see from the Trump Administration’s enforcement agenda, and the impact that could have on U.S. jobs, American consumers, and the global trading system.

International Tax and Competitiveness

This session featuring James Gould, Principal at Ogilvy Government Relations, and Catherine Schultz, Vice President for Tax Policy at National Foreign Trade Council, provided an overview of the international tax regime, efforts to reform the tax treatment of foreign earnings and investment, and the implications of these policies on the competitiveness of US firms.

Digital Trade

This session highlighted new technologies and how trade policies can be adapted to 21st Century business. Speakers included Christine Bliss, President at Coalition of Services Industries, and Stephen Ezell, Vice President of Global Innovation Policy at The Information Technology & Innovation Foundation.

Views on Trade from Around the World

This session looked at the future of trade in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Speakers included David Brightling, Counsellor (Trade), Embassy of Australia; Rodrigo A. Contreras, Head of Economic Department / Trade Commissioner, Embassy of Chile; Damien Levie, Head of Section – Trade and Agriculture section, Delegation of the European Union to the United States of America; Katrin Kuhlmann, President and Founder, New Markets Lab.

7th Annual Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) Conference

Friday, April 21, 2017

Elliott School of International Affairs
George Washington University 1957 E Street NW Suite 505
Washington D.C. 20052

The Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) is a forum that highlights trade research at institutions in the Washington D.C. area. Its primary activity is sponsoring an annual research conference where scholars present their latest academic work. Researchers from George Washington University, American University, the Census Bureau, the Federal Reserve Board, Georgetown University, the Inter-American Development Bank, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the U.S. International Trade Commission, the University of Maryland, and the World Bank have all participated in the symposium.

Contact iiep@gwu.edu with any questions.

View the Schedule
8:30 – 9:00 AM: Continental Breakfast and Registration
9:00 – 9:40 AM: Eunhee Lee (University of Maryland):
“Trade, Inequality, and the Endogenous Sorting of Heterogeneous Workers”
Discussant: Lindsay Oldenski (Georgetown University)
9:40 – 10:20 AM: Ferdinando Monte (Georgetown University):
“The Local Incidence of Trade Shocks”
Discussant: Illenin Kondo (Federal Reserve Board)
10:20 – 10:40 AM: Coffee Break
10:40 – 11:20 AM: Paul Piveteau (SAIS-Johns Hopkins):
“An empirical dynamic model of trade with consumer accumulation”
Discussant: Colin Hottman (Federal Reserve Board)
11:20 – 12:00 PM: Aaron Flaaen (Federal Reserve Board):
“The Role of Transfer Prices in Profit Shifting by U.S. Multinationals: Evidence from the 2004 Homeland Investment”
Discussant: JaeBin Ahn (International Monetary Fund)
12:00 – 1:40 PM: Lunch and Keynote:
Keith Maskus (Chief Economist Department of State and University of Colorado-Boulder)
1:40 – 2:20 PM: Maggie Chen (George Washington University):
“An Anatomy of Foreign Investment News”
Discussant: Rod Ludema (Georgetown University)
2:20 – 3:00 PM: Moises Yi (Census Bureau):
“Industry Mix, Local Labor Markets, and the Incidence of Trade Shocks”
Discussant: Marisol Rodriguez Chatruc (Inter-American Development Bank)
3:00 – 3:20 PM: Coffee Break
3:20 – 4:00 PM: Juan Blyde (Inter-American Development Bank):
“The Impact of Chinese Competition on Mexican Labor Outcomes”
Discussant: Claire Brunel (American University)
4:00 – 4:40 PM: Aaditya Mattoo (World Bank):
“Trade Creation and Trade Diversion in Deep Agreements”
Discussant: Peter Herman (United States International Trade Commission)

George Washington University’s Institute for International Economic Policy, housed at the Elliott School of International Affairs, is dedicated to producing and disseminating high-quality non-partisan academic and policy relevant research on international economic policy. Areas of focus include international trade, international finance, and development economics.

Growth Strategies in a De-Globalizing World

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

4:00 to 5:30pm – Reception to Follow

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
City View Room, 7th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

The Institute for International Economic Policy and the Growth Dialogue cordially invite you to participate in a Ministerial Dialogue at the time of the Spring Meetings of the IMF/World Bank. The conversation, to be chaired by Danny Leipziger, Prof. of International Business and International Affairs, George Washington University and Managing Director of the Growth Dialogue, will focus on the impact of current shifts in the global economic landscape and their implications for national growth strategies.

The event will be followed by a reception at the City View Room from 5:30pm to 7:00pm.

Participants will include:

The Hon. Mauricio Cárdenas, Minister of Finance and Public Credit, Colombia

The Hon. Sri Mulyani Indrawati, Minister of Finance, Indonesia

The Hon. Santiago Peña, Minister of Finance, Paraguay

The Hon. Malusi Gigaba, Minister of Finance, South Africa

Dr. Hyun Oh-Seok, Former Minister of Strategy & Finance, Korea

Dr, Joaquim Levy, Managing Director, World Bank

Dr. Adam Posen, President, Peterson Institute for International Economics

How Presidents Make Economic Policy in Times of Crisis” feat. Alejandro Bonvecchi

Thursday, February 16, 2017

12:00 to 2:00pm

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

This project argues that presidents organize decision-making to respond to economic crises not driven by personality or institutional constraints, but rather by cognitive contexts. The higher the frequency of crises, the more inclined the president to use hierarchical, rather than collegial, decision-making processes. The argument is tested comparing cases in the US and Argentina.

Alejandro Bonvecchi holds a BA in Sociology from the University of Buenos Aires and a Ph.D. in Government from the University of Essex. He is an Assistant Professor at the Torcuato Di Tella University in Buenos Aires and an Adjunct Research of the National Council for Scientific and Technical Research in Argentina, where he works on presidential and legislative politics and the political economy of economic policymaking. He has published four books, and his work has appeared in Presidential Studies Quarterly, Legislative Studies Quarterly, Publius, Latin American Politics and Society, and Journal of Politics in Latin America.

View the presentation here

Discussants

Stephen Kaplan, Associate Professor of Political Science and International affairs at The George Washington University

Stephen B. Kaplan is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs. Professor Kaplan’s research and teaching interests focus on the frontiers of international and comparative political economy, where he specializes in the political economy of global finance and development, the rise of China in the Western Hemisphere, and Latin American politics. Professor Kaplan joined the GWU faculty in the fall of 2010 after completing a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University and his Ph.D at Yale University. While at Yale, Kaplan also worked as a researcher for former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo at the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization. Prior to his doctoral studies, Professor Kaplan was a senior economic analyst at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, writing extensively on developing country economics, global financial market developments, and emerging market crises from 1998 to 2003. He received his B.A in International Relations and Economics from Tufts University, and an M.S in International Economic Development from Georgetown University.

Jay Shambaugh, Professor of Economics and International Affairs at The George Washington University

Jay Shambaugh is a professor of economics and international affairs at the George Washington University. He is the director of the Institute for International Economic Policy. Professor Shambaugh’s area of research is macroeconomics and international economics. His work includes analysis of the interaction of exchange rate regimes with monetary policy, capital flows, and trade flows as well as studies of international reserves holdings, country balance sheet exchange rate exposure, the cross-country impact of fiscal policy, and the current crisis in the euro area. In addition to his book, Exchange Rate Regimes in the Modern Era (MIT Press, 2009), Shambaugh has published in The American Economic Review, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, and other leading journals. Prior to joining the faculty at George Washington, Shambaugh taught at Georgetown and Dartmouth and served as first Senior Economist for International Economics and then Chief Economist at the White House Council of Economic Advisers. He is also a Faculty Research Fellow at the NBER and a visiting scholar at the IMF. Shambaugh received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.A. from the Fletcher School at Tufts, and a B.A. from Yale University.

Trumping Trade Orthodoxy

Friday, February 3, 2017

9:00am to 4:00pm

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

President Trump has promised a markedly new direction in U.S. trade policy through tweets, appointments, and executive orders. Regardless of these first steps and initial press reports, substantial questions remain about whether some of the actions in fact can be adopted within existing legislative and constitutional constraints. In other areas, President Trump’s authority to pursue radically different policies likely are well-established. George Washington’s Institute for International Economic Policy hosted a full day conference to examine what President Trump can, and cannot, do on trade policy without new congressional authorization. Participants will hear from panels that will include a team of two leading lawyers and economists with substantial first-hand trade policy experience. This conference provided audience members with important perspectives on the limits of President Trump’s emerging trade policy.

 View video from the conference at the IIEP YouTube Channel

View the Schedule
8:15 AM – 9:00 AM: Registration and Breakfast

 

9:00 AM – 9:15 AM: Opening Remarks and Introduction, Michael Moore (George Washington University)

 

9:15 AM – 10:15 AM: Trade Remedies

The President has substantial leeway for initiating various trade remedy actions (antidumping, countervailing duty, and safeguards). U.S. trade law practice and procedure may limit the scope of imposing duties under these provisions.

10:15 AM – 11:15 AM: China as a ‘Currency Manipulator’

The U.S. Treasury may determine that a country manipulates its currency but only under certain statutory conditions. Would China qualify under those provisions? What consequences might it face if China is declared a “currency manipulator”?

11:15 AM – 11:30 AM: Coffee Break

 

11:30 AM – 12:30 PM: Renegotiating/Leaving Existing Trade Agreements

U.S. trade agreements such as NAFTA allow for either Party to announce a withdrawal with six months’ notice. Can President Trump do so without congressional approval? What would be the impact on U.S. trade and investment flows if he were to follow through with such threats?

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM: Lunch

 

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM: Tax Policy, Investment Agreements, & Foreign Direct Investment

President Trump has suggested imposing 35 percent tariffs on individual U.S. firms that offshore manufacturing jobs. Can the Administration single out individual companies in this way? How might such threats increase uncertainty on inward and outward U.S. foreign investment?

2:30 PM – 2:45 PM: Coffee Break

 

2:45 PM – 3:45 PM: Possible WTO Disputes

An aggressive new U.S. trade policy may result in formal disputes with WTO members. What are the most likely cases that might arise? How might the U.S. economy be affected if the WTO rules in favor of those who contest new U.S. approaches in trade policy?

3:45 PM – 4:00 PM: Concluding Remarks

2nd Annual Frenzel Memorial Lecture

 See video of the event here.

 

Thursday October 6, 2016

5:00 to 6:30pm

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

On behalf of the Institute for International Economic Policy, GWU, and the International Tax and Investment Center, you are cordially invited to the 2nd Annual Frenzel Memorial Lecture on Tax and Trade on October 6, 2016. The event is named in honor of Bill Frenzel, the founding Chairman of the ITIC and 10-term U.S. House of Representatives Member. Frenzel, who passed away in 2014, is best known for having been a leading authority on tax and trade issues in Congress. The Frenzel Memorial Lecture will feature the Honorable Robert B. Zoellick, former World Bank President.

 

5:00 PM: Welcome and Introduction and Tribute to Bill Frenzel
  • Ambassador (Ret.) Reuben Brigety, Dean, Elliott School of International Affairs
  • The Honorable Dave Camp, Honorary Co-Chairman, ITIC Board of Directors, Senior Policy Advisor, PwC, Former Chairman, House Committee on Ways and Means
5:05 PM: Setting the Stage
  • Graciela Kaminsky, Professor of Economics and International Affairs, GWU, will share some of the research being undertaken at GWU on the challenges facing the global economy
5:15 PM: Q&A Interview Discussion: Trade & Global Macroeconomic Policy
  • The Honorable Robert B. Zoellick, former World Bank President and former U.S. Trade Representative
  • Moderated by Jeffrey E. Garten, Dean Emeritus of the Yale School of Management, Former Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade
6:30 PM: Reception
  • 6th Floor Lounge, 1957 E Street, NW

6th Annual Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) Conference

Friday, April 29, 2016

School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University
Bernstein-Offit Building, Room 500
1717 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington D.C. 20036

The Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) is a forum that highlights trade research at institutions in the Washington D.C. area. Its primary activity is sponsoring an annual research conference where scholars present their latest academic work. Researchers from George Washington University, American University, the Census Bureau, the Federal Reserve Board, Georgetown University, the Inter-American Development Bank, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the U.S. International Trade Commission, the University of Maryland, and the World Bank have all participated in the symposium.

Contact iiep@gwu.edu with any questions.

View the Schedule
8:30 – 9:00 AM: Continental Breakfast and Opening Comments
9:00 – 9:45 AM: JaeBin Ahn (International Monetary Fund):
“Reassessing the Productivity Gains from Trade Liberalization”
Discussant: Jennifer Poole (American University)
9:45 – 10:30 AM: Olga Timoshenko (George Washington University):
“Learning, Prices, and Firm Dynamics”
Discussant: Luca David Opromolla (Banco de Portugal, University of Maryland and CEPR)
10:30 – 10:45 AM: Coffee Break
10:45 – 11:30 AM: Mine Senses (Johns Hopkins University):
“Trade Shocks and the Provision of Local Public Goods”
Discussant: Erhan Artuc (World Bank)
11:30 – 12:15 PM: J. Bradford Jensen (Georgetown University, Peterson Institute and NBER):
“The Tradability of Services: Geographic Concentration and Trade Costs”
Discussant: Jose Signoret (US International Trade Commission)
12:15 – 1:00 PM: Lunch Break
1:00 – 2:00 PM: Kadee Russ (University of California-Davis, Council of Economic Advisers and NBER):
“Trade Policy in Practice: The TPP from an Insider’s Perspective”
2:00 – 2:15 PM: Coffee Break
2:15 – 3:00 PM: Maria Tito (Federal Reserve Board):
“Misallocation, Trade, and Productivity: Evidence from Chinese Data”
Discussant: Maggie Chen (George Washington University)
3:00 – 3:45 PM: Chad P. Bown (Peterson Institute and CEPR):
“Global Supply Chains and Trade Policy”
Discussant: Juan Blyde (Inter-American Development Bank)
3:45 – 4:00 PM: Coffee Break
4:00 – 4:45 PM: Claire Brunel (American University):
“Green Innovation and Green Manufacturing: Links Between Environmental Policies, Innovation and Production”
Discussant: Cristina Tello Trillo (Census Bureau)
4:45 – 5:00 PM: Closing Remarks

George Washington University’s Institute for International Economic Policy, housed at the Elliott School of International Affairs, is dedicated to producing and disseminating high-quality non-partisan academic and policy relevant research on international economic policy. Areas of focus include international trade, international finance, and development economics.

The Star and the Stripes: A History of the Foreign Policies of American Jews

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

5:30 to 7:30pm

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052

Please join the GW’s Elliott School of International Affairs, Institute for Security and Conflict Studies, and Institute for Middle East Studies for a panel discussion featuring Michael Barnett, University Professor of Political Science and International Affairs (GWU), Shibley Telhami, Anwar Sadat Professor for Peace and Development (University of Maryland), and Tamara Wittes, Director of the Center for Middle East Policy (The Brookings Institution) on Barnett’s new book, “The Star and the Stripes: A History of the Foreign Policies of American Jews.”

 

RSVP here

5th Annual Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) Conference

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
1957 E St. NW
Washington D.C. 20052

The Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) is a forum that highlights trade research at institutions in the Washington D.C. area. Its primary activity is sponsoring an annual research conference where scholars present their latest academic work. Researchers from George Washington University, American University, the Census Bureau, the Federal Reserve Board, Georgetown University, the Inter-American Development Bank, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the U.S. International Trade Commission, the University of Maryland, and the World Bank have all participated in the symposium.

Contact iiep@gwu.edu with any questions.

View the Schedule
8:00 AM: Continental Breakfast and Opening Comments
8:15 AM: Paulo Bastos (WB)
Session 1: “Overcoming the Tyranny of History: Evidence from Post-Apartheid South Africa”
Discussant: Remi Jedwab (GW)
9:00 AM: Anna Maria Mayda (GT)
Session 2: “The Impact of Skilled Foreign Workers on Firms: an Investigation of Publicly Traded U.S. Firms”
Discussant: Mine Senses (JHU)
9:45 AM: Coffee Break
10:00 AM: Ryan Monarch (FRB)
Session 3: “Learning and the Value of Relationships in International Trade”
Discussant: Olga Timoshenko (GWU)
10:45 AM: Christian Volpe (IDB)
Session 4: “The Border Labyrinth: Information Technologies and Trade in the Presence of Multiple Agencies”
Discussant: Justin Peirce (FRB)
11:30 AM: Lunch
12:30 PM: Maggie Chen (GWU)
Session 5: “Learning and Reputation in Trade”
Discussant: Serge Shikher (USITC)
1:15 PM: Heiwai Tang (JHU)
Session 6: “Trade-induced Quality Upgrading: Transaction-level Evidence from Portugal”
Discussant: Andrew McCallum (FRB)
2:00 PM: Overflow and Closing Remarks
2:30 PM: End

George Washington University’s Institute for International Economic Policy, housed at the Elliott School of International Affairs, is dedicated to producing and disseminating high-quality non-partisan academic and policy relevant research on international economic policy. Areas of focus include international trade, international finance, and development economics.

Sizing Up the Digital Economy: A Panel Discussing the Digital Economy and International Trade

Monday, April 23, 2018

5:30 to 7:00pm – Reception to Follow

 

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Commons, 6th floor
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052
The Institute for International Economic Policy at the George Washington University and the Greater Washington DC Chapter of the Internet Society invite you to a panel analyzing the new report of the US International Trade Commission (ITC) on the “digital economy.” The Senate Finance Committee requested that ITC analyze the economic impact of the digital economy. They also requested that ITC examine digital protectionism around the world.

The ITC found that “digital trade, through the combined effects of the Internet in enhancing productivity and lowering international trade costs in certain digitally intensive industries, has resulted in increase in U.S. gross domestic product of some four percent.”

James Stamps, Project Leader, will discuss the ITC Report. He will be followed by a panel of four commentators:

• Michael Mandel, Chief Economic Strategist of the Progressive Policy Institute ,will provide an economic assessment of the report.

• Jacquelynn Ruff, Vice President, International, of Verizon will provide a view from a leading Internet Service Provider (ISP).

• Linda Kinney, Senior Vice President, Motion Picture Association of America, will provide perspective from an association representing content providers.

• Usman Ahmed, Policy Counsel of eBay, will provide analysis from an e-commerce company’s viewpoint.

This event is a brown bag lunch. Light refreshments will be provided by the Progressive Policy Institute.

4th Annual Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) Conference

Thursday, April 25, 2014

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
1957 E St. NW
Washington D.C. 20052

The Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) is a forum that highlights trade research at institutions in the Washington D.C. area. Its primary activity is sponsoring an annual research conference where scholars present their latest academic work. Researchers from George Washington University, American University, the Census Bureau, the Federal Reserve Board, Georgetown University, the Inter-American Development Bank, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the U.S. International Trade Commission, the University of Maryland, and the World Bank have all participated in the symposium.

Contact iiep@gwu.edu with any questions.

View the Schedule

Download the conference schedule here.

 

8:30 – 8:55: Continental breakfast
8:55 – 9:00: Opening Comments — Michael Moore, GWU
9:00 – 9:45: Christian Volpe (IDB)
Session 1: “Customs: What are the Effects on International Trade”(Paper)
Discussant: Nick Zolas (Census)
9:45 – 10:30: Serge Shikher (USITC)
Session 2: “Comparative Advantages of Rich and Poor Countries”(Paper)
Discussant: Kara Reynolds (American)
10:30 – 10:45: Coffee break
10:45 – 11:30: Maggie Chen (GWU)
Session 3: “Foreign Rivals are Coming to Town: Responding to the Threat of Foreign Multinational Entry” (Paper)
Discussant: Bill Lincoln (JHU-SAIS)
11:30 – 12:15: Dan Bernhofen (American)
Session 4: “Estimating the Effects of the Container Revolution on World Trade” (Paper)
Discussant: Gisela Rua (Federal Reserve Board)
12:15 – 1:30: Lunch
1:30 – 2:15: Russell Hillberry (World Bank)
Session 5: “Import Dynamics and Demands for Protection” (Paper)
Discussant: Lindsay Oldenski (Georgetown)
2:15 – 3:00: Andrew McCallum (Federal Reserve Board)
Session 6: “The Structure of Export Entry Costs”
Discussant: Wenjie Chen (GWU)
3:00 – 3:15: Coffee break
3:15 – 4:00: Fariha Kamal (U.S. Census Bureau)
Session 7: “Buyer-Seller Relationships in International Trade: Do your Neighbors Matter?” (Paper)
Discussant: Olga Timoshenko (GWU)
4:00: Closing Comments — Christopher Kurz, Federal Reserve Board

George Washington University’s Institute for International Economic Policy, housed at the Elliott School of International Affairs, is dedicated to producing and disseminating high-quality non-partisan academic and policy relevant research on international economic policy. Areas of focus include international trade, international finance, and development economics.

3rd Annual Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) Conference

Friday, April 12, 2013

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
1957 E St. NW
Washington D.C. 20052

The Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) is a forum that highlights trade research at institutions in the Washington D.C. area. Its primary activity is sponsoring an annual research conference where scholars present their latest academic work. Researchers from George Washington University, American University, the Census Bureau, the Federal Reserve Board, Georgetown University, the Inter-American Development Bank, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the U.S. International Trade Commission, the University of Maryland, and the World Bank have all participated in the symposium.

Contact iiep@gwu.edu with any questions.

View the Schedule

Download the conference schedule here.

George Washington University’s Institute for International Economic Policy, housed at the Elliott School of International Affairs, is dedicated to producing and disseminating high-quality non-partisan academic and policy relevant research on international economic policy. Areas of focus include international trade, international finance, and development economics.

2nd Annual Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) Conference

Friday, April 6, 2012

Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St. NW
Washington D.C. 20052

The Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) is a forum that highlights trade research at institutions in the Washington D.C. area. Its primary activity is sponsoring an annual research conference where scholars present their latest academic work. Researchers from George Washington University, American University, the Census Bureau, the Federal Reserve Board, Georgetown University, the Inter-American Development Bank, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the U.S. International Trade Commission, the University of Maryland, and the World Bank have all participated in the symposium.

Contact iiep@gwu.edu with any questions.

View the Schedule

    • Session 2: 9:20-10:10
    • Mine Senses “Globalization, Labor Markets and the Role of Human Capital” Johns Hopkins University-SAIS (with Pravin Krishna and Guru Sethupathy)Presentation

      Teresa Fort as discussant – Comments


    • Coffee Break 

    • Session 3: 10:30-11:20
    • Anna Maria Mayda “Protection for Free? The Political Economy of U.S. Tariff Suspensions” Georgetown University (with Rod Ludema and Prachi Mishra)Presentation

      Michael Moore as discussant – Comments



    • Lunch



    • Coffee Break 

    • Session 7: 3:20-4:10
    • Chris Kurz “Trade and Volatility at the Firm and Plant Level” Federal Reserve Board (with Mine Senses)Presentation

      Logan Lewis as discussant – Comments


George Washington University’s Institute for International Economic Policy, housed at the Elliott School of International Affairs, is dedicated to producing and disseminating high-quality non-partisan academic and policy relevant research on international economic policy. Areas of focus include international trade, international finance, and development economics.

1st Annual Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) Conference

Friday, March 11, 2011

Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St. NW
Washington D.C. 20052

The Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) is a forum that highlights trade research at institutions in the Washington D.C. area. Its primary activity is sponsoring an annual research conference where scholars present their latest academic work. Researchers from George Washington University, American University, the Census Bureau, the Federal Reserve Board, Georgetown University, the Inter-American Development Bank, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the U.S. International Trade Commission, the University of Maryland, and the World Bank have all participated in the symposium.

Contact iiep@gwu.edu with any questions.

View the Schedule

George Washington University’s Institute for International Economic Policy, housed at the Elliott School of International Affairs, is dedicated to producing and disseminating high-quality non-partisan academic and policy relevant research on international economic policy. Areas of focus include international trade, international finance, and development economics.

Is Fairer Trade Compatible with Freer Markets?

Cosponsored by the Government of the Netherlands,
the Heinrich Boell Foundation and the Financial Times

Conference Videos coming soon.

Thursday, March 4 and Friday, March 5, 2010

Lindner Commons, Suite 602
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW
Washington, D.C. 20052

March 4, 2010

6:00-7:30 PM – Evening Keynote
Michael Conroy, PhD (Chair of the Board, TransFair)
Fairer Trade and Freer Trade: The Evolution of Strategies That Work for the Poor

March 5, 2010

8:00-8:30 AM Continental breakfast

 

8:30 – 9:00 AM
Introductory Remarks: Steve Suranovic (GWU-IIEP)
“Defining Fairness in Trade”
A description of the conference and an overview of what we mean by fairness as applied in international trade discussions. Do we mean fairness of outcome? Do we mean fairness of process, or both? PPT

 

9:00 – 10:30 AM – Fairness in the Real World
There is a lot of talk about fair trade, but we really know little about what policymakers, academics, and consumers are concerned about when they think about fair trade. This panel will focus on perceptions of fair trade among these groups and how these perceptions play out in global and national markets.
Michael Hiscox (Harvard) PPT
Shareen Hertel (UConn) Paper and PPT
Doug Nelson (Tulane and Univ. of Nottingham) Paper and PPT
Sean Ehrlich (Florida State) Paper

 

10:40-11:00 AM Coffee Break

 

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM – Consumers and Fair Trade
Is there sufficient consumer demand for products carrying social/eco labels signaling they are fairly produced? Are fair trade strategies workable and sustainable? How do public policies channel or distort fairer trade?
Daniel Stokes (TransFair FLO) Paper
Kelly Johnston (Vice President – Government Affairs, Campbells Soup) Paper
Eric Biel (Managing Director, Corporate Responsibility, Burston Marsteller)
Kim Elliott (CGD)

 

12:30 – 2:00 PM – Luncheon Keynote – “Making Markets Work for the Poor”
Monika Weber-Fahr
 (Global Business Line Leader, IFC, World Bank) PPT
Moderated by: James Politi (The Financial Times)

 

2:00 – 3:30 PM – Producers and Fair Trade
How can market actors work to achieve fairer outcomes for workers? Do such strategies yield more productive workers? How do they affect market share and profits?
David Berdish (Ford Motor Company) Paper
Rene Van Hell (Deputy Director for Trade Politics and Globalization in the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Holland) Paper
Bama Athreya (International Labor Rights Forum)
Charita Castro (Division Chief for Operations, Office of Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Human Trafficking, Bureau of International Labor Affairs) PPT P D F icon

 

3:30 – 3:45 PM – Coffee Break

 

3:45 – 4:30 PM – So, What do you think? Are Freer Markets Compatible with Fairer Outcomes for the Poor?
Prof. Susan Aaronson (GWU) will ask audience questions focused on the Conference objective, “Are Free Markets Compatible with Fairer Outcomes for the poor?”
Will fair trade strategies yield fairer outcomes?
Will they distort trade?
Will consumers respond? If so, what are the best strategies to achieve fairer trade?

4:30 – 4:45 PM – Conclusions
Prof. Steve Suranovic (GWU) will summarize the conference findings: What do we think about these options? What is the future of fairer trade strategies?

Climate Change and the World Trading System

Dr. Steve Charnovitz – GWU

Gary Clyde Hufbauer and Jisun Kim – Peterson Institute

View the paper here.

This event was made possible by a generous grant from an anonymous donor. It is a discussion of the book Climate Change and the World Trading System, co-authored with Cary Clyde and Jisun Kim (Peterson Institute).

Friday, September 18, 2009

12:00 to 2:00pm

 

Suite 601M
1957 E St NW
Washington, DC 20052

Antidumping Use Across the World

Implications for Developing Countries and U.S. Businesses

Thursday and Friday, April 9 & 10, 2009

8:00 – 3:00 PM (Thursday), 8:00 – 1:30 PM (Friday)

Lindner Commons, Suite 602
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW
Washington, D.C. 20052

Thursday, April 9, 2009

 

8:00 – 8:45 AM – Continental breakfast

 

8:45 – 9:45 AM – Tom Prusa (Rutgers and NBER) – Trade Liberalization, Tariff Overhang and Antidumping Filing in Developing Countries”
Discussant: Michael Moore (GWU-IIEP)

 

9:45 – 10:45 AM – Maurizio Zanardi (ULB-ECARES): “Trade Liberalization and Antidumping in Developing Countries: Is There a Substitution Effect?”
Discussant: Rod Ludema (Georgetown)

 

10:45 – 11:00 AM – Coffee Break

 

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM – Kara Reynolds (American): “Overcoming Free-Riding: A Cross-Country Analysis of Firm Participation in Antidumping Petitions” 
Discussant: Judith Dean (USITC)

 

12:00 – 1:00 PM – Lunch

 

1:00 – 2:00 PM – Chad Bown (Brandeis)
Discussant: Bob Feinberg (American)

 

2:00 – 3:00 PM – Justin Pierce (Georgetown): “Plant Level Responses to Antidumping Duties: Evidence from U.S. Manufacturers” 
Discussant: Maggie Chen (GWU-IIEP)

==============================================

Friday, April 10, 2009

 

“Expanding Use of Antidumping and Prospects for Reform”

 

8:00 – 9:00 AM – Continental breakfast

 

9:00 – 10:00 AM – Global Antidumping Use and Implications for Developing Countries
Chad Bown (Brandeis)
Maurizio Zanardi (ULB-ECARES)
Jorge Miranda (King and Spaulding)

 

10:00 – 11:00 AM – Basic Concepts of Antidumping
Tom Prusa (Rutgers and NBER) – Economists’ Views
Matt Nolan (Arent Fox) – Lawyers’ views
Stephen Claeys (former Dep. Asst. Sec. for Import Administration) – Administrators’ views

 

11:00 – 11:15 AM – Coffee Break

 

11:15 AM – 12:15 PM – Reforming Antidumping
Michael Moore (GWU-IIEP) – Economists’ views
Jim Durling (Winston and Strawn) – Respondent Lawyers’ views
Stephen Jones (King and Spaulding) – Petitioner Lawyers’ views

 

12:15 – 1:30 PM – Lunch and Keynote Address
Grant Aldonas (former Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade)
“Trade Remedies’ Impact on U.S. Commercial Policy”

NAFTA at 15

Assessing the Past and Preparing for the Future

Friday, March 27, 2009

Lindner Commons, Suite 602
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW
Washington, D.C. 20052

8:30 – 9:20 AM Continental breakfast

 

9:20 – 9:30 AM
Introductory Remarks: Michael Moore (GWU-IIEP)

 

9:30 – 10:45 AM – NAFTA’s Origins and Impact on the U.S. and Canada
Moderator: Steve Suranovic (GWU-IIEP)
Sidney Weintraub (Center for Strategic and International Studies): Origins of North American Integration
Gary Hufbauer (Peterson Institute): NAFTA and the U.S.
Richard Harris (Simon Fraser University): NAFTA and Canada

 

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM – Impact on Mexico
Moderator: Cynthia McClintock (GWU-LAHSP)
Nora Lustig (GWU-IIEP): Growth, Inequality and Poverty in Post-NAFTA Mexico
Eric Verhoogen (Columbia University): Impact on Mexican Firms
Phil Martin (University of California – Davis): Immigration flows under NAFTA

 

12:00 – 12:45 PM – Remarks on “The Future of NAFTA” by Jaime Serra (former Mexican chief negotiator for NAFTA)

 

12:45 – 1:45 PM – Lunch

1:45 – 3:00 PM – What’s Next for North American Integration? Views from the Academy
Moderator: Nora Lustig (GWU-IIEP)
Robert Pastor (American University)
Gustavo Vega (El Colegio de Mexico) PowerPoint
John Curtis (Centre for International Governance Innovation)

 

3:00 – 3:15 PM – Coffee Break

 

3:15 – 4:30 PM – North American Governments’ Priorities
Moderator: Michael Moore (GWU-IIEP)
Grant Aldonas (former U.S. Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade)
Beatriz Leycegui (Mexican Undersecretary of Economy for International Trade Negotiations) PowerPoint
Susan Harper (Economic Minister for the Embassy of Canada)

The U.S.-Peru Free Trade Agreement: Implementation and Impact

Alvaro Henzler (Economic Advisor to the Ambassador of Peru, professor at Georgetown University and Universidad del Pacifico)
Carlos Mateo Paz-Soldan (DTB Associates)
José Raul Perales (Senior Program Associate for Latin America at the Woodrow Wilson Center)

Joint with the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program

Thursday, October 30, 2008

12:00 pm – 1:45 pm

 

Duques Hall Suite 451
2201 G Street, NW
Washington, DC 20052

Trade and the Hill: What to Expect Post-Election

Eric Euland – The Duberstein Group; former chief of staff to Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R., Tennessee)
David Castagnetti – Mehlman Vogel Castagnetti, Inc.; former chief of staff to both Senator Max Baucus (D., Montana) and former Rep. Norman Mineta (D., California)
Jennifer Mulveny – Sandler, Travis and Rosenberg; former deputy assistant U.S. trade representative for congressional affairs under President George W. Bush, and Republican professional staff, House Ways and Means Committee
Steve Champlin – Vice President of the Duberstein Group, and former Executive Director of the House Democratic Caucus

Joint with the Consumers for World Trade Education Fund
This is a U.S. Foreign Policy Priorities

Tuesday, October 14, 2008

12:00 to 2:00pm

 

Lindner Commons, Suite 602
1957 E St., NW
Washington, DC 20052

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