Financial Regulation and Supervision: Lessons from the Crisis

The Institute for International Economic Policy, the National Center for Sustainable Development, and the Bertelsmann Foundation

International Monetary Fund

Conference videos coming soon.

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

8:15 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

City View Room, 7th Floor
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW
Washington, D.C. 20052

Continental breakfast at 8:15 AM

8:45-9:00 AM: Welcome and Opening Remarks

Stephen C. Smith (Director, Institute for International Economic Policy, and Professor of Economics and International Affairs, GW)

9:00-10:00 AM: Session 1 – What Went Wrong: Market and Regulatory Failures

Prof. John Geanakoplos (Yale University)
Prof. Matthew Richardson (NYU)

10:00-10:15 AM: Coffee Break

10:15-11:15 PM: Session 1 (cont’d) – What Went Wrong: Market and Regulatory Failures

Prof. Ross Levine (Brown University)
Prof. Phillip Swagel (Georgetown University & former Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy

11:15-11:30 AM: Coffee Break

11:30AM-1:00 PM: Session 2 – The Regulation of Financial Institutions

Dr. Stijn Claessens (Research Department, IMF)
Prof. Douglas Gale (NYU)
Prof. Mark Flannery (University of Florida)

1:00-2:30 PM: Lunch Break

2:30-4:00 PM: Session 3 – The Regulation of Financial Markets

Dr. Laura Kodres (Research Department, IMF)
Prof. Neil Pearson (University of Illinois)
Prof. Erik Stafford (Harvard Business School)

4:00-4:15 PM: Coffee Break

4:15-5:00 PM: Keynote Address – The Regulatory Response to the Financial Crisis: An Early Assessment

Dr. Jeffrey Lacker – President, Federal Reserve Board of Richmond

5:00-5:30 PM: Open Floor Discussion

IIEP Climate and Energy Forum: Policy Comparisons and Business Perspectives: The Coal and Solar Sectors in China, U.S.A. and Germany

Co-sponsored by the National Center for Sustainable Development,
and the Bertelsmann Foundation

This event is part of the Institute for International Economic Policy’s Adaptation to Climate Change Initiative.

Friday, April 23, 2010

7:30 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E St., NW
Elliott School of International Affairs
George Washington University
Washington, DC

7:30am: Registration and Breakfast

8:30am: Welcome Remarks (bilingual): Prof. Maggie Xiaoyang Chen – GWU

8:40am: Introduction to Roundtable Topics and Participants
Framing of the discussion topics, and Overview of the Forum
Prof. Stephen Smith – Director, Institute for International Economic Policy, GWU

9:00am: Introduction of the First Panel
The Public Sector Role in Setting the Rules of the Game for Economic and Environmental Balance

Moderator: Prof. Arun Malik – GWU

China Reps: Chen Huan – Deputy Director General, CDM Fund
Dr. Wen Gang – Ministry of Finance

U.S. Rep: Dr. Phyllis Yoshida – Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Energy Cooperation, Department of Energy

German Rep: Matthias Sonn – Minister for Economic Affairs, German Embassy – Washington, DC and Board Director, US-German Business Council

Questions to pose for Perspectives and Comparison

1. WHAT IS YOUR PERSPECTIVE ON THE PUBLIC ROLE IN THE ENERGY SECTOR, IN SEEKING ECONOMIC AND CLIMATE BALANCE?

2.  HOW DO YOU ENVISION THE WAY THE PUBLIC SECTOR WILL INTERACT WITH THE PRIVATE SECTOR?

2. WHAT ARE THE MAIN CONSTRAINTS ON IMPLEMENTING THE APPROPRIATE PUBLIC ROLE?

3. WHAT DO YOU VIEW AS UNIQUE TO YOUR COUNTRY FROM THE VIEWPOINT OF SPECIAL POLICY CHALLENGES AND SPECIAL COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES?

10:00am: Audience Participation Questions – Questions collected from the audience during the primary panel discussion and posed by the moderator at this time.

10:30am: Coffee Break

11:00am: Introduction of Second Panel
The Private Sector Role in Promoting Viable Balanced Markets to achieve low carbon intensity sustainable development:

Moderator: Prof. Fred Joutz – GWU

China Reps: Chen Huan – Deputy Director General, CDM Fund
Dr. Wen Gang – Ministry of Finance

U.S. Rep: Tom Mackey – Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Clean Coal Project

German Rep: TBA

Questions to Pose for Implementation and Comparison

1. WHAT DOES THE PRIVATE SECTOR NEED FROM THE PUBLIC SECTOR?

2. WHAT SIGNIFICANT UNWARRANTED CONSTRAINTS COME FROM THE PUBLIC SECTOR?

3. WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE BALANCED AND SUSTAINABLE FUTURE OF THE RESPECTIVE ENERGY SUBSECTORS?

4. WHAT FINANCING CONSTRAINTS ARE PRESENT?

12:00 noon: Audience Participation Questions – Questions collected from the audience during the second panel discussion will be posed by the moderator at this time.

12:30pm: Lunch

1:00pm: Keynote Speaker & Questions
1:15pm: Keynote Speaker introduction by Annette Heuser: Executive Director, Bertelsmann Foundation, Washington, DC

“Energy and Climate Policy: Practical Lessons from Germany”

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Klaus Scharioth – German Ambassador to the United States of America

2:00pm: Wrap up by: Mitchell F. Stanley, President & Trustee, National Center for Sustainable Development, Washington, DC

Is Fairer Trade Compatible with Freer Markets?

Cosponsored by the Government of the Netherlands,
the Heinrich Boell Foundation and the Financial Times

Conference Videos coming soon.

Thursday, March 4 and Friday, March 5, 2010

Lindner Commons, Suite 602
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW
Washington, D.C. 20052

March 4, 2010

6:00-7:30 PM – Evening Keynote
Michael Conroy, PhD (Chair of the Board, TransFair)
Fairer Trade and Freer Trade: The Evolution of Strategies That Work for the Poor

March 5, 2010

8:00-8:30 AM Continental breakfast

 

8:30 – 9:00 AM
Introductory Remarks: Steve Suranovic (GWU-IIEP)
“Defining Fairness in Trade”
A description of the conference and an overview of what we mean by fairness as applied in international trade discussions. Do we mean fairness of outcome? Do we mean fairness of process, or both? PPT

 

9:00 – 10:30 AM – Fairness in the Real World
There is a lot of talk about fair trade, but we really know little about what policymakers, academics, and consumers are concerned about when they think about fair trade. This panel will focus on perceptions of fair trade among these groups and how these perceptions play out in global and national markets.
Michael Hiscox (Harvard) PPT
Shareen Hertel (UConn) Paper and PPT
Doug Nelson (Tulane and Univ. of Nottingham) Paper and PPT
Sean Ehrlich (Florida State) Paper

 

10:40-11:00 AM Coffee Break

 

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM – Consumers and Fair Trade
Is there sufficient consumer demand for products carrying social/eco labels signaling they are fairly produced? Are fair trade strategies workable and sustainable? How do public policies channel or distort fairer trade?
Daniel Stokes (TransFair FLO) Paper
Kelly Johnston (Vice President – Government Affairs, Campbells Soup) Paper
Eric Biel (Managing Director, Corporate Responsibility, Burston Marsteller)
Kim Elliott (CGD)

 

12:30 – 2:00 PM – Luncheon Keynote – “Making Markets Work for the Poor”
Monika Weber-Fahr
 (Global Business Line Leader, IFC, World Bank) PPT
Moderated by: James Politi (The Financial Times)

 

2:00 – 3:30 PM – Producers and Fair Trade
How can market actors work to achieve fairer outcomes for workers? Do such strategies yield more productive workers? How do they affect market share and profits?
David Berdish (Ford Motor Company) Paper
Rene Van Hell (Deputy Director for Trade Politics and Globalization in the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Holland) Paper
Bama Athreya (International Labor Rights Forum)
Charita Castro (Division Chief for Operations, Office of Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Human Trafficking, Bureau of International Labor Affairs) PPT P D F icon

 

3:30 – 3:45 PM – Coffee Break

 

3:45 – 4:30 PM – So, What do you think? Are Freer Markets Compatible with Fairer Outcomes for the Poor?
Prof. Susan Aaronson (GWU) will ask audience questions focused on the Conference objective, “Are Free Markets Compatible with Fairer Outcomes for the poor?”
Will fair trade strategies yield fairer outcomes?
Will they distort trade?
Will consumers respond? If so, what are the best strategies to achieve fairer trade?

4:30 – 4:45 PM – Conclusions
Prof. Steve Suranovic (GWU) will summarize the conference findings: What do we think about these options? What is the future of fairer trade strategies?

2nd Annual Conference on China’s Economic Development and the U.S. China-Relationship

Friday, November 20, 2009

Continental breakfast at 8:00 AM

9:00 AM: Welcome and Overview of the Conference

Stephen C. Smith (Director, Institute for International Economic Policy, and Professor of Economics and International Affairs, GW) Trends in China’s Development and U.S.-China Trade

9:15-10:00 AM: Opening address and charge to the conference

Dr. Harry Harding (Dean, University of Virginia, former Elliott School Dean, and former University Professor at GW) The G-2 Chimera: Fusion or Illusion? – Paper

10:00-10:30 AM: Coffee Break

10:30 AM – 12:30 PM: Session 1: Transformations and Emerging Challenges in the Economy of China

Bruce Reynolds (Professor of Economics, University of Virginia) Macro Problems and Macro Policy in China and the United States: Lessons from the Economic Crisis – PPT

Loren Brandt (Professor of Economics, University of Toronto) – PPT

John Giles (Associate Professor of Economics, Michigan State University, and Senior Labor Economist, World Bank) The Current and Future Well Being of China’s Rural Elderly – Paper and PPT

Dr. Xiaobo Zhang (Senior Research Fellow, International Food Policy Research Institute) The Competitive Savings Motive: Evidence from Rising Sex Ratios and Savings Rates in China – Paper and PPT and Transcript

Dr. Lixin Colin Xu (Senior Economist, World Bank)

12:30-1:00 PM: Lunch

1:00-1:45 PM: Luncheon Keynote Speaker

Dr. Fred Bergsten (Founder and Director, Peterson Institute of International Economics) – “The United States-China Economic Relationship and the Strategic and Economic Dialogue“. Paper – Two’s Company (Letter to the Editor of Foriegn Affairs Magazine) – Paper

1:45-2:00 PM: Coffee Break

2:00-4:00 PM: Session 2: Crisis, Emergence of the G2 relationship, and Future Challenges

Zhu Caihua (Associate Professor of International Economics, China Foreign Affairs University) FDI Flows Between China and the US: Implications for Sino-US Economic Relations – Paper 

Dr. Philip Levy (Resident Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, and former Senior Economist at the Council of Economic Advisers) The Sustainability of Chinese Economic Success: Implications for Future Sino-U.S. Relations

Margaret Pearson (Professor of Government and Politics, University of Maryland) China as a G2 Member: What are the Political Constraints? – Paper 

Bruce Dickson (Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW)

An archive of all previous Annual Conferences on China’s Economic Development and U.S.-China Economic Relations is available here.

For more information, please contact Kyle Renner at iiep@gwu.edu or 202-994-5320.

Co-sponsored by:

Climate Change and the World Trading System

Dr. Steve Charnovitz – GWU

Gary Clyde Hufbauer and Jisun Kim – Peterson Institute

View the paper here.

This event was made possible by a generous grant from an anonymous donor. It is a discussion of the book Climate Change and the World Trading System, co-authored with Cary Clyde and Jisun Kim (Peterson Institute).

Friday, September 18, 2009

12:00 to 2:00pm

 

Suite 601M
1957 E St NW
Washington, DC 20052

Antidumping Use Across the World

Implications for Developing Countries and U.S. Businesses

Thursday and Friday, April 9 & 10, 2009

8:00 – 3:00 PM (Thursday), 8:00 – 1:30 PM (Friday)

Lindner Commons, Suite 602
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW
Washington, D.C. 20052

Thursday, April 9, 2009

 

8:00 – 8:45 AM – Continental breakfast

 

8:45 – 9:45 AM – Tom Prusa (Rutgers and NBER) – Trade Liberalization, Tariff Overhang and Antidumping Filing in Developing Countries”
Discussant: Michael Moore (GWU-IIEP)

 

9:45 – 10:45 AM – Maurizio Zanardi (ULB-ECARES): “Trade Liberalization and Antidumping in Developing Countries: Is There a Substitution Effect?”
Discussant: Rod Ludema (Georgetown)

 

10:45 – 11:00 AM – Coffee Break

 

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM – Kara Reynolds (American): “Overcoming Free-Riding: A Cross-Country Analysis of Firm Participation in Antidumping Petitions” 
Discussant: Judith Dean (USITC)

 

12:00 – 1:00 PM – Lunch

 

1:00 – 2:00 PM – Chad Bown (Brandeis)
Discussant: Bob Feinberg (American)

 

2:00 – 3:00 PM – Justin Pierce (Georgetown): “Plant Level Responses to Antidumping Duties: Evidence from U.S. Manufacturers” 
Discussant: Maggie Chen (GWU-IIEP)

==============================================

Friday, April 10, 2009

 

“Expanding Use of Antidumping and Prospects for Reform”

 

8:00 – 9:00 AM – Continental breakfast

 

9:00 – 10:00 AM – Global Antidumping Use and Implications for Developing Countries
Chad Bown (Brandeis)
Maurizio Zanardi (ULB-ECARES)
Jorge Miranda (King and Spaulding)

 

10:00 – 11:00 AM – Basic Concepts of Antidumping
Tom Prusa (Rutgers and NBER) – Economists’ Views
Matt Nolan (Arent Fox) – Lawyers’ views
Stephen Claeys (former Dep. Asst. Sec. for Import Administration) – Administrators’ views

 

11:00 – 11:15 AM – Coffee Break

 

11:15 AM – 12:15 PM – Reforming Antidumping
Michael Moore (GWU-IIEP) – Economists’ views
Jim Durling (Winston and Strawn) – Respondent Lawyers’ views
Stephen Jones (King and Spaulding) – Petitioner Lawyers’ views

 

12:15 – 1:30 PM – Lunch and Keynote Address
Grant Aldonas (former Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade)
“Trade Remedies’ Impact on U.S. Commercial Policy”

NAFTA at 15

Assessing the Past and Preparing for the Future

Friday, March 27, 2009

Lindner Commons, Suite 602
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW
Washington, D.C. 20052

8:30 – 9:20 AM Continental breakfast

 

9:20 – 9:30 AM
Introductory Remarks: Michael Moore (GWU-IIEP)

 

9:30 – 10:45 AM – NAFTA’s Origins and Impact on the U.S. and Canada
Moderator: Steve Suranovic (GWU-IIEP)
Sidney Weintraub (Center for Strategic and International Studies): Origins of North American Integration
Gary Hufbauer (Peterson Institute): NAFTA and the U.S.
Richard Harris (Simon Fraser University): NAFTA and Canada

 

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM – Impact on Mexico
Moderator: Cynthia McClintock (GWU-LAHSP)
Nora Lustig (GWU-IIEP): Growth, Inequality and Poverty in Post-NAFTA Mexico
Eric Verhoogen (Columbia University): Impact on Mexican Firms
Phil Martin (University of California – Davis): Immigration flows under NAFTA

 

12:00 – 12:45 PM – Remarks on “The Future of NAFTA” by Jaime Serra (former Mexican chief negotiator for NAFTA)

 

12:45 – 1:45 PM – Lunch

1:45 – 3:00 PM – What’s Next for North American Integration? Views from the Academy
Moderator: Nora Lustig (GWU-IIEP)
Robert Pastor (American University)
Gustavo Vega (El Colegio de Mexico) PowerPoint
John Curtis (Centre for International Governance Innovation)

 

3:00 – 3:15 PM – Coffee Break

 

3:15 – 4:30 PM – North American Governments’ Priorities
Moderator: Michael Moore (GWU-IIEP)
Grant Aldonas (former U.S. Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade)
Beatriz Leycegui (Mexican Undersecretary of Economy for International Trade Negotiations) PowerPoint
Susan Harper (Economic Minister for the Embassy of Canada)

The U.S.-Peru Free Trade Agreement: Implementation and Impact

Alvaro Henzler (Economic Advisor to the Ambassador of Peru, professor at Georgetown University and Universidad del Pacifico)
Carlos Mateo Paz-Soldan (DTB Associates)
José Raul Perales (Senior Program Associate for Latin America at the Woodrow Wilson Center)

Joint with the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program

Thursday, October 30, 2008

12:00 pm – 1:45 pm

 

Duques Hall Suite 451
2201 G Street, NW
Washington, DC 20052

1st Annual Conference on China’s Economic Development and the U.S. China Relationship

Monday, October 20, 2008

 

Continental breakfast from 8:30 AM

9:30-10:45 AM: The U.S. and China in the World Economy 
This session will examine the global context of the relationship, including macroeconomic conditions and global energy markets.

Warwick McKibbin (Professor of Economics at Australian National University, Member of the Board of the Reserve Bank of Australia and Nonresident Fellow at the Brookings Institution)

David Pumphrey (Deputy Director and Senior Fellow of the Energy and National Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Energy Cooperation at the Department of Energy)

Jiawen Yang (Professor of International Business and International Affairs at the George Washington University, co-author of Case Studies of U.S. Economic Sanctions: The Chinese, Cuban and Iranian Experience)

10:45-11:00 AM: Coffee break

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM: U.S. and China Trade and Investment Issues

This session will explore current controversies surrounding U.S. economic relations.

Jim Mendenhall (Partner at Sidley Austin, LLP and former General Counsel at Office of the U.S. Trade Representative)

Patrick Mulloy (Member of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission and former Assistant Secretary of Commerce)

Eswar Prasad (Tolani Senior Professor of Trade Policy at Cornell University, Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution, Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and former Chief of the China Division at the International Monetary Fund).

12:30-1:45 PM: Lunch

2:00-3:15 PM: The Future of U.S.-China Relations

The final group of panelist will discuss the economic and political future of the two countries.

Albert Keidel (Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and former Acting Director and Deputy Director for the Office of East Asian Nations at the U.S. Treasury Department)

Philip Levy (Resident Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and former Senior Economist at the Council of Economic Advisers)

David Shambaugh (Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at The George Washington University, Director of the China Policy Program at the Elliott School of International Affairs, and Nonresident Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution).

An archive of all previous Annual Conferences on China’s Economic Development and U.S.-China Economic Relations is available here.

For more information, please contact Kyle Renner at iiep@gwu.edu or 202-994-5320.

Trade and the Hill: What to Expect Post-Election

Eric Euland – The Duberstein Group; former chief of staff to Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R., Tennessee)
David Castagnetti – Mehlman Vogel Castagnetti, Inc.; former chief of staff to both Senator Max Baucus (D., Montana) and former Rep. Norman Mineta (D., California)
Jennifer Mulveny – Sandler, Travis and Rosenberg; former deputy assistant U.S. trade representative for congressional affairs under President George W. Bush, and Republican professional staff, House Ways and Means Committee
Steve Champlin – Vice President of the Duberstein Group, and former Executive Director of the House Democratic Caucus

Joint with the Consumers for World Trade Education Fund
This is a U.S. Foreign Policy Priorities

Tuesday, October 14, 2008

12:00 to 2:00pm

 

Lindner Commons, Suite 602
1957 E St., NW
Washington, DC 20052

A Research Symposium on New Directions for Research on Microfinance

Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy, GWU Department of Economics,and GW-Center for International Business Education and Research

Friday, April 20, 2007

Alumni House
1925 F St., NW
Washington, D.C. 20052

9:30 AM: Welcome and Overview of the Conference

Stephen C. Smith (Professor of Economics and International Affairs, GW)

 

9:45-10:45 AM: Alain de Janvry and Elisabeth Sadoulet (University of California-Berkeley and World Bank), “The Supply and Demand Side of Credit Information,” (with Craig McIntosh, University of California-San Diego)

 

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM: Joe Kaboski, (OSU) “Testing a Structural Model of Credit Constraints Using a Large-Scale Quasi Experimental Microfinance Initiative,” (with Robert Townsend, University of Chicago)

 

12:00-1:00 PM: Lunch

 

1:00-2:00 PM: Jonathan Conning, (Hunter College/CUNY), “Foundations of Social Investment” (with Jonanthan Morduch, New York University)

 

2:15-3:15 PM Shahe Emran, (GWU), “Microfinance and Missing Markets” (with Joseph Stiglitz, Columbia University)

 

3:30-4:30 PM Dean Karlan, (Yale University), “Expanding Credit Access: Using Randomized Supply Decisions to Estimate the Impacts” (with Jonathan Zinman, Dartmouth University)

 

4:30 PM Closing Remarks

GW is committed to digital accessibility. If you experience a barrier that affects your ability to access content on this page, let us know via the Accessibility Feedback Form.